The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale
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A New York Times Notable Book 

The inspiration for PBS''s AMERICAN EXPERIENCE film The Poison Squad.

From Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times-bestselling author Deborah Blum, the dramatic true story of how food was made safe in the United States and the heroes, led by the inimitable Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley, who fought for change


By the end of nineteenth century, food was dangerous. Lethal, even. "Milk" might contain formaldehyde, most often used to embalm corpses. Decaying meat was preserved with both salicylic acid, a pharmaceutical chemical, and borax, a compound first identified as a cleaning product. This was not by accident; food manufacturers had rushed to embrace the rise of industrial chemistry, and were knowingly selling harmful products. Unchecked by government regulation, basic safety, or even labelling requirements, they put profit before the health of their customers. By some estimates, in New York City alone, thousands of children were killed by "embalmed milk" every year. Citizens--activists, journalists, scientists, and women''s groups--began agitating for change. But even as protective measures were enacted in Europe, American corporations blocked even modest regulations. Then, in 1883, Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley, a chemistry professor from Purdue University, was named chief chemist of the agriculture department, and the agency began methodically investigating food and drink fraud, even conducting shocking human tests on groups of young men who came to be known as, "The Poison Squad."

Over the next thirty years, a titanic struggle took place, with the courageous and fascinating Dr. Wiley campaigning indefatigably for food safety and consumer protection. Together with a gallant cast, including the muckraking reporter Upton Sinclair, whose fiction revealed the horrific truth about the Chicago stockyards; Fannie Farmer, then the most famous cookbook author in the country; and Henry J. Heinz, one of the few food producers who actively advocated for pure food, Dr. Wiley changed history. When the landmark 1906 Food and Drug Act was finally passed, it was known across the land, as "Dr. Wiley''s Law."

Blum brings to life this timeless and hugely satisfying "David and Goliath" tale with righteous verve and style, driving home the moral imperative of confronting corporate greed and government corruption with a bracing clarity, which speaks resoundingly to the enormous social and political challenges we face today.

Review

Full of fascinating detail . . . a valuable contribution to understanding the politics of food.”— Nature
 
“[Blum’s] prose is graceful, and her book is full of vivid, unsettling detail. . . . The Poison Squad offers a powerful reminder that truth can defeat lies, that government can protect consumers and that an honest public servant can overcome the greed of private interests.”— Eric Schlosser, New York Times Book Review

“A detailed, highly readable history of food and drink regulation in the United States. . . . [THE POISON SQUAD] shows the push and pull of competing economic, political and social interests. The journey our country has taken in establishing food, drink and drug regulation is an important one to understand because it is still going on.”— Wall Street Journal
 
“Blum draws from her meticulous research to re-create the battle between regulation in the name of consumer protection and production in the name of profits.”— Scientific American

“Riveting. . . . Blum isn’t just telling one scientist’s story but a broader one about the relationship between science and society. . . . [A] timely tale about how scientists and citizens can work together on meaningful consumer protections.”— Science magazine

“[E]ngrossing. . . .  Blum’s well-informed narrative—complete with intricate battles between industry lobbyists and a coalition of scientists, food activists, and women’s groups—illuminates the birth of the modern regulatory state and its tangle of reformist zeal, policy dog-fights, and occasional overreach. . . . [A] page-turner.”— Publishers Weekly

 “You’ve probably never heard of Harvey Washington Wiley, but he’s probably the reason you aren’t sick right now. . . . Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Blum tells [Wiley’s] whole story in this fascinating book.”— Lit Hub

“Fascinating. . . . The Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 ended a century of scandal and bitter political maneuvering, with major impetus from Harvey Washington Wiley, a genuinely unknown American hero. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Blum offers less a biography than a vivid account of Wiley’s achievements. . . . An expert life of an undeservedly obscure American.”— Kirkus 
 
“[A] compellingly detailed chronicle. . . . Citing worrisome recent attacks on consumer-protection laws, Blum reminds readers of the twenty-first-century relevance of Wiley’s cause.”— Booklist

About the Author

Deborah Blum is director of the Knight Science Journalism Program at MIT, and editor of Undark magazine, (undark.org). In 1992, she won the Pulitzer Prize for a series on primate research, which she turned into a book,  The Monkey Wars. Her other books include  The Poisoner''s HandbookGhost HuntersLove at Goon Park, and  Sex on the Brain. She has written for publications including  The New York TimesWiredTimeDiscoverMother JonesThe Guardian and  The Boston Globe. Blum is a past president of the National Association of Science Writers, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a lifetime associate of the National Academy of Sciences.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
422 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

Henry
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you time travel to the 1900''s, you may want to take your lunch with you!
Reviewed in the United States on November 5, 2018
I heard the author interviewed on the radio and it sounded interesting. It is a very detailed look at the beginning of the industrialization of food in the US, when we moved to large scale food processing and distribution. All types of food, candy, medicines, and beverages... See more
I heard the author interviewed on the radio and it sounded interesting. It is a very detailed look at the beginning of the industrialization of food in the US, when we moved to large scale food processing and distribution. All types of food, candy, medicines, and beverages were modified, faked, disguised or adulterated with additives, preservatives, fillers, colorants, discolorants, watered down, and it was all legal, because there were no food laws.

If formaldehyde in your milk or meat sounds wholesome, this era is for you. A short list of the ingredients that were routinely added to food, beverages, candy, and medicine; formaldehyde, coal tar (or aniline) dyes, copper sulfate, zinc, salicylic acid, methyl alcohol, borax, sulfuric acid, diethylene glycol, sodium sulfite, alum, coconut and almond and other nut shells, sawdust, morphine, heroin, cocaine, arsenic, mercury, lead, copper....

Harvey Wiley led what was the forerunner of the Food and Drug Administration and battled all sorts of obstacles, but made slow, steady progress. He used healthy human volunteers to test some of the additives, they were known as the ‘Poison Squad’.

His foes and a few friends were both big and little food processors, politicians on the take, trade associations protecting their turf, beareaucrats, The Women’s Christian Temperance Union, Upton Sinclair, Good Housekeeping magazine, throw in Teddy Roosevelt and the Roughriders, it was a wild time back in those days.

At the end of 29 years with the US Department of Agriculture, Wiley had established a blueprint for food testing and more importantly convinced a significant number of people that we should be testing and protecting our food from all sorts of adulterations.

Again, if time travel ever becomes feasible, and you travel back to the early 1900s, you may want to take your lunch with you.
35 people found this helpful
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RetiredGuy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
No, this could never happen now.
Reviewed in the United States on November 29, 2018
To be honest I had never heard of the Poison Squad nor Dr. Wiley. Now I know about the birth of the FDA. You''ll also begin to realize that current efforts to get rid of government regulations (yes, the Trump administration) of food, environment, fuel consumption, what have... See more
To be honest I had never heard of the Poison Squad nor Dr. Wiley. Now I know about the birth of the FDA. You''ll also begin to realize that current efforts to get rid of government regulations (yes, the Trump administration) of food, environment, fuel consumption, what have you, do not benefit we the consumers.

This is a fascinating look back at how one man bulldozed his way to help us all.
23 people found this helpful
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Eliezer Gomes
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Boring read with too much attention given to unimportant details
Reviewed in the United States on February 9, 2019
The theme is very interesting but the author fails to focus on the most important facts. The writing is not concise - e.g.: he goes on and on about the canned meat sent to US soldiers in the war against Spain in Cuba without revealing anything interesting. There is no... See more
The theme is very interesting but the author fails to focus on the most important facts. The writing is not concise - e.g.: he goes on and on about the canned meat sent to US soldiers in the war against Spain in Cuba without revealing anything interesting. There is no climax. He mentions products but do not explain what they are. There are long lists with contributors right at the beginning of the book. He mentions some food additives and preservatives that we not necessarily know but he does not explain possible health hazards caused by these. I think that the main problem with the book is the fact that the author is writing about a scientific topic without having the proper basic scientific knowledge to understand what should be the focus of his text. Evidence of this lack of knowledge can be seen on his explanation about glucose, located at about 6% of the reading for those using an e-reader.
13 people found this helpful
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cynicallyinclined
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well done
Reviewed in the United States on November 14, 2018
As a former health inspector at the local level it is nice to see a book written about a public servant who championed the public health against the seemingly insurmountable profit driven food and drug industry.
22 people found this helpful
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DrJudyStone
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A timely warning about deregulation and food safety
Reviewed in the United States on December 16, 2018
With the rash of bad food safety news and attempts at deregulation, @DeborahBlum’s book, The Poison Squad, couldn’t have been better timed. Reading this will make you an ardent advocate for stronger regulation, not relaxing it. Can you imaging a review board (IRB) now... See more
With the rash of bad food safety news and attempts at deregulation, @DeborahBlum’s book, The Poison Squad, couldn’t have been better timed. Reading this will make you an ardent advocate for stronger regulation, not relaxing it. Can you imaging a review board (IRB) now allowing Wiley’s testing of adulterants on healthy volunteers?

I’ve regularly written about food safety from the infectious disease or outbreak perspective. This is the other side of the coin, with fraudulent and dangerous food additives.

Drug development for safety and efficacy was the focus of much of my professional career. Counterfeit medicines also have a huge overlap with Infectious Diseases, as illustrated by the growth of artemisinin-resistant malaria.

Blum’s thoroughly documented, engaging—and at times nauseating—read, is a must-read for anyone who is concerned about health and safety-- in particular, of children. It is graphic, of necessity.

The Poison Squad is a call to arms for more safety and protection for whistle-blowers, not a laissez-faire government.

Well-deserved acclamation and placement on “Best Science Books” lists.
15 people found this helpful
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lisaleo (Lisa Yount)
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
important subject, but slow reading
Reviewed in the United States on July 9, 2020
This book is about Harvey Washington Wiley, the chief chemist for the U.S. Agriculture Department, and his lifelong crusade to outlaw the widespread adulteration of processed foods, especially the cheap grades sold to poor people, with materials that ranged from disgusting... See more
This book is about Harvey Washington Wiley, the chief chemist for the U.S. Agriculture Department, and his lifelong crusade to outlaw the widespread adulteration of processed foods, especially the cheap grades sold to poor people, with materials that ranged from disgusting (rotten meat, insect parts, floor sweepings) to the downright poisonous (formaldehyde and worse). He was the force behind the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Law, the country’s first, and a major influence behind the 1938 revision of same that established the FDA. Some of his methods were flamboyant enough to make headlines, especially his testing of borax and other common food additives on healthy young male volunteers, dubbed the “Poison Squad,” to disprove the claims of food processors that such substances were harmless.

Thanks to Wiley and his supporters and political descendants, modern consumers don’t have to “wonder what’s in it” when they sit down to a meal to the extent that turn-of-the-old-century diners did—but, as Blum points out in an epilogue, more subtle dangers may still exist, and the current government administration, as pro-business as the ones Wiley so frustratedly served under, is working to make rollbacks in FDA regulations that would make the former Chief Chemist spin in his grave. Because of that danger, Blum felt that modern readers should know Wiley’s largely forgotten story, and I agree with her.

I bought this book after seeing an excellent PBS American Experience program about Wiley, during which Blum was interviewed extensively, and also because I’d greatly enjoyed a previous book she’d written about another early-20th-century health reformer, The Poisoner’s Handbook. Unfortunately, the Wiley book proved to be much slower going than that earlier one, perhaps because he and his supporters had to fight the same battles over and over with the processing business and their friends in government, which often included the occupant of the White House as well as Wiley’s immediate superior in the Agriculture Department. The rather enjoyable description of the Poison Squad’s activities made up only a small part of it. I finished the book, but I had to push myself to do so. I therefore recommend it as an important and sometimes interesting story, but readers are likely to need determination and patience (as well as strong stomachs) to make it through to the end.
2 people found this helpful
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Adele S.
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Reading this in 2020 was a very bad idea.
Reviewed in the United States on December 4, 2020
Let me begin by saying that this book was maybe 5% of what I expected it to be - which was about the Poison Squad, what chemicals they tested, how the tests went and what the ultimate findings were on each item the Squad was subjected to. The lack of focus on the titular... See more
Let me begin by saying that this book was maybe 5% of what I expected it to be - which was about the Poison Squad, what chemicals they tested, how the tests went and what the ultimate findings were on each item the Squad was subjected to. The lack of focus on the titular topic was disappointing, but the focus on political infighting, corporate interests over public welfare and the pointing out that this goes on from our country''s founding to continue to this very day is infuriating and dispiriting.

The blurb compares Wliey''s efforts to a David versus Goliath effort. David DEFEATED Goliath. These consumer and environmental protection issues are continuously rehashed and Wiley died decades ago, so this book basically gives Goliath the win. Oh, but the creation of the FDA and all this stuff about truth in labelling were major wins, you say? When Administrations can, will and have come along to basically render the FDA and laws applying to protection to be moot.

"This sense of deja vu , echoing down the years, should remind us of the ways that the food safety practices have dramatically changes in this country - and of the ways they have changed hardly at all." What kind of note is that to end on? Reading this in 2020 where so much of history from over 100 years ago seems to be repeating itself was a mistake. If you, like me, are infuriated by our country and leaders learning from the past to do something better for now and the future, then this book is just fuel for the fire of rage. But we''re supposed to take it as inspiration to keep fighting? When all that all of this does is repeatedly highlight how those with wealth and power don''t care about the majority of Americans and will always strive to serve their own personal interests and profits?

If I had bought a physical copy of this book, I swear I would be shredding and burning it right now.
One person found this helpful
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C. Ellen Connally
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An interesting story that could have been told without some details - maybe another focus
Reviewed in the United States on March 25, 2019
This is an interesting story of the development of food safety in the United States. As you begin the book you wonder how people survived on the food that was laced with all kinds of chemical. We want to think that our ancestors ate healthy. But in reality they ate... See more
This is an interesting story of the development of food safety in the United States. As you begin the book you wonder how people survived on the food that was laced with all kinds of chemical. We want to think that our ancestors ate healthy. But in reality they ate poison.

The story focus on Dr. Harvey Wiley and his campaign to get chemicals out of food and have food and drink properly labeled so that people would know what they were eating and drinking. He was fought at every step by the manufactures and government. His experiment with men who were feed chemically laced food would never past muster today because of ethical questions but it served its purpose for the time. Thanks to those good men!

But once the point is made early in the book there is a great deal of repetitive information that does not add a lot to the story. We learn that the names and identities of the men have been lost but it would have been interesting to find out more about them.

It''s amazing out the makers of these products had no concern for the health of the buyers. Even when they knew people and especially children and babies were dying, they were only concerned about the profits. That part of the story is very sad.

It''s an interesting story but seems that it was stretched to make an entire book.
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Peer Sylvester
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Sehr USA-zentriert
Reviewed in Germany on April 5, 2020
Von Deborah Blum habe ich vorher das Poisoners Handbook gelesen, dass sich mit der Gründung des ersten forensischen Labors in New York befasst. Da chemische Analsen auch in Europa noch nicht viel weiter waren, war dies eine Geschichte, über die Anfangszeiten, zudem garbiert...See more
Von Deborah Blum habe ich vorher das Poisoners Handbook gelesen, dass sich mit der Gründung des ersten forensischen Labors in New York befasst. Da chemische Analsen auch in Europa noch nicht viel weiter waren, war dies eine Geschichte, über die Anfangszeiten, zudem garbiert mit True Crime - Geschichten. In diesem Buch widmet sie sich jetzt der Geschichte von Harvey Wiley, der sich Ende des 19. / Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts dem Kampf gegen Lebensmittelzusätze verschrieben hatte und mit dessen Hilfe in den USA die ersten Gesetze gegen Lebensmittelzusätze geschrieben wurden. Dabei ist die Geschichte vollständig, aber sehr US-zentriert. Das fällt hier mehr auf, denn Europa war da doch z.T. sehr viel weiter als die USA. Zudem bestehen größere Teile des Buches aus Fehden innerhalb des Ministeriums und um juristische Auseinandersetzungen. Das ,liegt in der Natur der Sache, ermüdet aber stellenweise. Natürlich ist es schon interessant zu sehen, wie groß die Probleme der USA schon damals waren (und wieder sind), die Interessen des Verbrauchers über die der Industrie zu setzen. So muss man schon über statements den Kopf schütteln, wie das (giftige) Kupfersalze nicht verboten werden können, weil sonst die Erbsenindustrie pleite geht. Oder das auch gefärbter Industriealkohol aus Whiskey verkauft werden dürfte, da Whiskey ja selbst gar kein Naturprodukt ist. Manches erkennt man aus heutigen Diskussionen wieder und tatsächlich wird im Epilog auch ein Bezug zu gewissen Aussagen von Trump gezogen. Dennoch sind diese Parallelen doch etwas wenig um den Fokus auf eine Person zu rechtfertigen, wenn man sich nicht gerade besonders für diesen speziellen Anteil der Geschichte interessiert. Wer sich umfassender über die Geschichte der Lebensmittelzusätze und -skandale interessiert, dürfte das sehr viel umfassendere (aber immer noch populärwissenschaftliche) "Swindled" von Bee Wilson bevorzugen.
Von Deborah Blum habe ich vorher das Poisoners Handbook gelesen, dass sich mit der Gründung des ersten forensischen Labors in New York befasst. Da chemische Analsen auch in Europa noch nicht viel weiter waren, war dies eine Geschichte, über die Anfangszeiten, zudem garbiert mit True Crime - Geschichten.

In diesem Buch widmet sie sich jetzt der Geschichte von Harvey Wiley, der sich Ende des 19. / Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts dem Kampf gegen Lebensmittelzusätze verschrieben hatte und mit dessen Hilfe in den USA die ersten Gesetze gegen Lebensmittelzusätze geschrieben wurden. Dabei ist die Geschichte vollständig, aber sehr US-zentriert. Das fällt hier mehr auf, denn Europa war da doch z.T. sehr viel weiter als die USA. Zudem bestehen größere Teile des Buches aus Fehden innerhalb des Ministeriums und um juristische Auseinandersetzungen. Das ,liegt in der Natur der Sache, ermüdet aber stellenweise. Natürlich ist es schon interessant zu sehen, wie groß die Probleme der USA schon damals waren (und wieder sind), die Interessen des Verbrauchers über die der Industrie zu setzen. So muss man schon über statements den Kopf schütteln, wie das (giftige) Kupfersalze nicht verboten werden können, weil sonst die Erbsenindustrie pleite geht. Oder das auch gefärbter Industriealkohol aus Whiskey verkauft werden dürfte, da Whiskey ja selbst gar kein Naturprodukt ist. Manches erkennt man aus heutigen Diskussionen wieder und tatsächlich wird im Epilog auch ein Bezug zu gewissen Aussagen von Trump gezogen.
Dennoch sind diese Parallelen doch etwas wenig um den Fokus auf eine Person zu rechtfertigen, wenn man sich nicht gerade besonders für diesen speziellen Anteil der Geschichte interessiert.
Wer sich umfassender über die Geschichte der Lebensmittelzusätze und -skandale interessiert, dürfte das sehr viel umfassendere (aber immer noch populärwissenschaftliche) "Swindled" von Bee Wilson bevorzugen.
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Amazon Customer Berlin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Longing for The Good Old Days? Perhaps... but after reading this book, not their food!
Reviewed in Germany on December 26, 2018
This is not the book to read before dinner. However it is a fascinating account of mass adulteration of food and drink in the USA and the emergence of scientific testing, laws and regulations designed to protect the public and insure certain minimum standards of purity and...See more
This is not the book to read before dinner. However it is a fascinating account of mass adulteration of food and drink in the USA and the emergence of scientific testing, laws and regulations designed to protect the public and insure certain minimum standards of purity and public safety. Well written, well paced and detailed without ever becoming mired in chemistry or obscure science. You don''t need to be a lab technician to understand and enjoy this compelling history. If you thought the cow stepping in the milk bucket was bad, let me assure you, back in the day that was nothing. Read this book and you will never complain about FDA regulations again.
This is not the book to read before dinner. However it is a fascinating account of mass adulteration of food and drink in the USA and the emergence of scientific testing, laws and regulations designed to protect the public and insure certain minimum standards of purity and public safety. Well written, well paced and detailed without ever becoming mired in chemistry or obscure science. You don''t need to be a lab technician to understand and enjoy this compelling history. If you thought the cow stepping in the milk bucket was bad, let me assure you, back in the day that was nothing. Read this book and you will never complain about FDA regulations again.
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david
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beware of processed food
Reviewed in India on March 1, 2019
Excellent book on the hazards for customers of the food industry. Message for me: eat food (not anything packaged or processed. Eat plants only. It’s a dangerous world.
Excellent book on the hazards for customers of the food industry. Message for me: eat food (not anything packaged or processed. Eat plants only. It’s a dangerous world.
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Luiz Puech
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A política dos alimentos.
Reviewed in Brazil on November 20, 2018
Excelente título!
Excelente título!
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The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food sale Safety sale at the Turn of the Twentieth Century outlet sale