The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

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This is a book originally sold by The Easton Press, 47 Richards Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06857 as part of its "100 Greatest Books Ever Written Collector''s Edition" collection which then evolved into "The Greatest Books Ever Written" collection. Many of the books carry a 1979 copyright but may have been printed in different years with different cover art. This is a leather-bound volume featuring 22kt gold accents, illustrations, moiré fabric endsheets, gilded page ends, and a satin-ribbon page marker.

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4.2 out of 54.2 out of 5
23 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

F. S. L'hoir
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The House of Atreus Has Fallen on Evil Days
Reviewed in the United States on January 21, 2019
Avoid this travesty like the plague. Were Aeschylus alive, he''d sue this company for defamation of his poetry, which when performed by professionals (i.e. the like of Paul Scofield or Ian McKellen, or Diana Rigg) mesmerises and horrifies the listener as the... See more
Avoid this travesty like the plague.

Were Aeschylus alive, he''d sue this company for defamation of his poetry, which when performed by professionals (i.e. the like of Paul Scofield or Ian McKellen, or Diana Rigg) mesmerises and horrifies the listener as the complex plot tightens upon the protagonists, reaches its point of no return, and then loosens its grip, lapsing into the utmost simplicity of language.

To borrow the gist of Aeschylus'' words given to the Watchman: I''ll say no more, but the House itself, if it could speak, might speak plainly. A great Ox stands on my tongue.

I wish it had stood on theirs!
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Fiddlemom
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Oresteia
Reviewed in the United States on July 4, 2011
I am listening to this with my 8th grade daughter. We are both finding it much more interesting than we thought we would, and easier to follow than we expected. The different voices make the characters easy to tell apart, and the actors and actresses are all quite good.... See more
I am listening to this with my 8th grade daughter. We are both finding it much more interesting than we thought we would, and easier to follow than we expected. The different voices make the characters easy to tell apart, and the actors and actresses are all quite good. We especially liked whoever played Cassandra. We were afraid this might be dry and boring, but it is most definitely not. It is full of emotion and is actually captivating.
3 people found this helpful
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Hellenic Kithara-player
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Superb final act
Reviewed in the United States on July 31, 2007
All told, very good version of the plays. Some may question the choice of certain actors or the choice of using distortion, most likely electronic, to enhance certain characters, but the plays do work. The final act, The Eumenides, comes off particularly well.... See more
All told, very good version of the plays. Some may question the choice of certain actors or the choice of using distortion, most likely electronic, to enhance certain characters, but the plays do work.

The final act, The Eumenides, comes off particularly well. At the very end the chorus is sung to a marvelous melody that comes quite by surprise, providing an amazing lift to the play.
10 people found this helpful
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Angel Clare
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on September 14, 2014
A great old story. The translation is cumbersome but poetic.
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Digby Geste
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Poor quality
Reviewed in the United States on February 5, 2018
Very Marked up and no slip case.
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Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
good
Reviewed in the United States on October 31, 2017
Prompt delivery, good price
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M. Faith
5.0 out of 5 stars
Lucid and thought-provoking production of the trilogy
Reviewed in the United States on November 15, 2007
Imagine yourself a member of an audience sitting in a Greek amphitheater over 2,000 years ago, caught up in the ebb and flow of a tragic drama unfolding before you, hanging on every word proclaimed by the larger-than-life masked actors who move across the stage--now... See more
Imagine yourself a member of an audience sitting in a Greek amphitheater over 2,000 years ago, caught up in the ebb and flow of a tragic drama unfolding before you, hanging on every word proclaimed by the larger-than-life masked actors who move across the stage--now lamenting in unison, now pitted against one another in angry confrontation--and you will get a sense of what it''s like to listen to this 2007 full-cast audio production of Aeschylus''s tragic trilogy, The Oresteia. It is an event. An event that draws you in and holds you focused on murder and mayhem and their come-uppance. An event that marches inexorably toward a restoration of the balance in the universe.

This adaptation by Yuri Rasovsky (and under his expert direction) captures not only the characters, the story line, and the tone of this tragic sequence but also its quintessential sense of time and place. No bad deed goes unpunished--especially when it involves killing one''s own family. The performances are clear and straightforward, and Rasovsky''s orchestration of them brings out the themes that weave their way through all three plays of the trilogy. Never intrusive, the device of using electronic distortion to enhance several of the voices serves, among other things, to distinguish gods from mortals, and is well within the spirit of the larger-than-life masks with built-in megaphones used in Greek theater.

This Hollywood Theater of the Ear production is a thoughtful and thought-provoking, as well as enjoyable, rendition of the plays.
16 people found this helpful
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Maicol
2.0 out of 5 stars
Christopher Gill is my favorite intermediary at this point
Reviewed in the United States on December 30, 2017
Fagles interpretative essay of 100 pages is over the top. Based on this essay, I would not seek translations by Fagle in the future. Christopher Gill is my favorite intermediary at this point.
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David Wilmshurst
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Violence Solves Nothing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 15, 2004
This beautifully-produced book is worth buying for the introduction alone, which has some eminently sane remarks on the wisdom with which Athena in the Eumenides pacifies the Furies and brings to an end an intractable cycle of tit-for-tat violence. Agamemnon''s sacrifice of...See more
This beautifully-produced book is worth buying for the introduction alone, which has some eminently sane remarks on the wisdom with which Athena in the Eumenides pacifies the Furies and brings to an end an intractable cycle of tit-for-tat violence. Agamemnon''s sacrifice of his daughter Iphigeneia to win a fair wind to Troy is avenged by his wife Clytemnestra in the first play of Aeschylus''s trilogy, ''Agamemnon''. Agamemnon''s son Orestes kills Clytemnestra in his turn in the second play, ''Choephoroe''. Orestes, pursued by the vindictive Furies, seeks shelter in Athens in the final play, ''Eumenides'', where he is acquitted of murder in a civil trial. The Furies, ''old gods'' baulked of their prey by the ''new'' Olympian gods, threaten revenge, but Athena soothes their offended sensibilities and offers them new honours and dignities at Athens. They accept, and the trilogy concludes with scenes of rejoicing. This is an excellent translation of the three plays, which preserves the dignity of Aeschylus''s language but remains eminently readable. I first read the trilogy thirty years ago, and had almost forgotten the dramatic stagecraft effects which Aeschylus deploys. Agamemnon, at Clytemnestra''s persuasion, arrogantly walking on a purple carpet as he goes to his doom; Clytemnestra''s partner-in-crime Aegisthus threatening to jail the courageous chorus of old men for speaking out against the murder of Agamemnon; Orestes confronting Clytemnestra before he kills her; and the Furies at the opening of the ''Eumenides'', snuffling and barking like dogs on the scent of a quarry. I had also forgotten what a splendid testimony ''Eumenides'' was to the democratic virtues of fifth-century BC Athens, then in conflict with oligarchic Sparta. Here, says Aeschylus, we do things differently. Murders are not punished by vendetta, but by the rule of law, by democratic trial. How right; how wise. The trilogy has an obvious message for all ages. Violence only begets more violence. The downward spiral of revenge in the ''Agamemnon'' and the ''Choephoroe'' is broken in the ''Eumenides'', but only because Athena, the goddess of wisdom, recognises the grievances of the old gods and redresses them. The resolution of bitter and longstanding feuds, as Aeschylus realised, nearly always requires the intervention of a disinterested third party.
13 people found this helpful
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Thetis of the Silver Feet
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Oresteia translated by M. Ewans
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 22, 2013
Excellent translation and easy to understand, unlike some of the more ''literal'' translations. Ewans also provides a very good introduction. I was however rather surprised as to the the cost of the book once I had receipt of it. It was second-hand in a fair to good condition...See more
Excellent translation and easy to understand, unlike some of the more ''literal'' translations. Ewans also provides a very good introduction. I was however rather surprised as to the the cost of the book once I had receipt of it. It was second-hand in a fair to good condition but the pages were a yellowy colour with a musty smell. In view of this, I do feel that I was somewhat overcharged by the seller given the original cost of the book was £5.99 and I was charged almost three times more than that...
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Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Justice or not for Orestos
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 26, 2015
I love the story and was very pleased with the play but the one thing that put me off were the American accents. However I soon got used to them and after a while didn''t hear them. There were a couple of words which were pronounced very strangely but I can''t think of them...See more
I love the story and was very pleased with the play but the one thing that put me off were the American accents. However I soon got used to them and after a while didn''t hear them. There were a couple of words which were pronounced very strangely but I can''t think of them offhand.all in all I was very happy to sit down with my sewing and listen to a good story.Pallas Athena had a beautiful voice, she could have persuaded anyone of anything.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 15, 2015
book in good condition
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Alan Titley
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Glorious greeks
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 4, 2014
Again, like my previous one, although I have got this, and checked to see if it worked (and it does), I haven''t listened to it yet. So judgement is suspended. Annoy me again.
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The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale

The Oresteia high quality (Easton Press outlet online sale Collector's Edition) outlet online sale