The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online
The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online__left

Used - Good: All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the library of" labels. Shrink wrap, dust covers, or boxed set case may be missing. Item may be missing bundled media.
See more
Sold by Bay State Book Company and fulfilled by Amazon.
[{"displayPrice":"$17.95","priceAmount":17.95,"currencySymbol":"$","integerValue":"17","decimalSeparator":".","fractionalValue":"95","symbolPosition":"left","hasSpace":false,"showFractionalPartIfEmpty":true,"offerListingId":"3hrAzoLejfkEwauprtqjrg5S8hIWzsF1VusyM9pa1%2F%2FaEWfHKUqAI5JnWYZFgCujGiC7v3wPJvLI3cIfPUc7pyG1YU4XnlckCm6Urn%2Fx%2B7RLgYYDtgKRYkuNyIz7VNQI6lNRt7uEoBo%3D","locale":"en-US","buyingOptionType":"NEW"},{"displayPrice":"$8.65","priceAmount":8.65,"currencySymbol":"$","integerValue":"8","decimalSeparator":".","fractionalValue":"65","symbolPosition":"left","hasSpace":false,"showFractionalPartIfEmpty":true,"offerListingId":"%2Fj8qyYn%2F7NNeBSb5WseyaYpyE%2BoVS5APn3tBDb8jw8sprDdqS3fzLL5nY6miy%2BJtQ8G92aZ9L61GBaWug8vNonI0nfXwBj%2Bpw93%2FUZyWj8RoLQtGDnztsFXqvh%2Bil%2BmE%2FunqaThHZ1k7I7AuhBMKLfaSnWTTJAvxnNWhnegFy7EIvW%2FxqBv9L1MPwqk%2FnZGQ","locale":"en-US","buyingOptionType":"USED"}]
$$17.95 () Includes selected options. Includes initial monthly payment and selected options. Details
Price
Subtotal
$$17.95
Subtotal
Initial payment breakdown
Shipping cost, delivery date, and order total (including tax) shown at checkout.
ADD TO LIST
Available at a lower price from other sellers that may not offer free Prime shipping.
SELL ON AMAZON
Share this product with friends
Text Message
WhatsApp
Copy
press and hold to copy
Email
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Loading your book clubs
There was a problem loading your book clubs. Please try again.
Not in a club? Learn more
Join or create book clubs
Choose books together
Track your books
Bring your club to Amazon Book Clubs, start a new book club and invite your friends to join, or find a club that’s right for you for free. Explore Amazon Book Clubs
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Frequently bought together

+
+
Choose items to buy together.
Buy all three: $49.68
$17.95
$16.95
$14.78
Total price:
To see our price, add these items to your cart.
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Book details

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Description

Product Description

The internationally acclaimed author of the L.A. Quartet and The Underworld USA Trilogy, James Ellroy, presents another literary noir masterpiece of historical paranoia.

In this savagely audacious novel, James Ellroy plants a pipe bomb under the America in the 1960s, lights the fuse, and watches the shrapnel fly. On November 22, 1963 three men converge in Dallas. Their job: to clean up the JFK hit’s loose ends and inconvenient witnesses. They are Wayne Tedrow, Jr., a Las Vegas cop with family ties to the lunatic right; Ward J. Littell, a defrocked FBI man turned underworld mouthpiece; and Pete Bondurant, a dope-runner and hit-man who serves as the mob’s emissary to the anti-Castro underground.

It goes bad from there. For the next five years these night-riders run a whirlwind of plots and counter-plots: Howard Hughes’s takeover of Vegas, J. Edgar Hoover’s war against the civil rights movement, the heroin trade in Vietnam, and the murders of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Bobby Kennedy. Wilder than L. A. Confidential, more devastating than American Tabloid, The Cold Six Thousand establishes Ellroy as one of our most fearless novelists.

From The New Yorker

Ellroy''s prose is easy to absorb sentence by sentence, thanks to his simple subject-verb-object constructions, but monstrous as it acquires cumulative force over hundreds of pages. This bruiser of a novel picks up Ellroy''s deeply pessimistic history lesson where his last, "American Tabloid," left off, with the murder of J.F.K., and builds toward the twin tragedies of the King and Robert Kennedy killings. Though characters reappear—most notably, the hit man Pete Bondurant and the Mob lawyer Ward Littell—there''s no comfort in the familiar faces. In fact, there''s no comfort at all. The novel is an exhausting, masochistic, often revelatory rereading of the allegedly idealistic sixties— an assassination, finally, of the decade rather than of its leaders.
Copyright © 2005 The New Yorker

Review

“Ellroy rips into American culture like a chainsaw in an abbatoir. . . . Pick it up if you dare; put it down if you can.” – Time

“A wild ride. . . . An American political underbelly teeming with conspiracy and crime. . . . So hard-boiled you could chip a tooth on it.” –The New York Times Book Review

“A ripping read....the book is pure testosterone.” –The Plain Dealer

“A great and terrible book about a great and terrible time in America.” – The Village Voice

From the Inside Flap

gely audacious novel, James Ellroy plants a pipe bomb under the America in the 1960s, lights the fuse, and watches the shrapnel fly. On November 22, 1963 three men converge in Dallas. Their job: to clean up the JFK hit’s loose ends and inconvenient witnesses. They are Wayne Tedrow, Jr., a Las Vegas cop with family ties to the lunatic right; Ward J. Littell, a defrocked FBI man turned underworld mouthpiece; and Pete Bondurant, a dope-runner and hit-man who serves as the mob’s emissary to the anti-Castro underground.

It goes bad from there. For the next five years these night-riders run a whirlwind of plots and counter-plots: Howard Hughes’s takeover of Vegas, J. Edgar Hoover’s war against the civil rights movement, the heroin trade in Vietnam, and the murders of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Bobby Kennedy. Wilder than L. A. Confidential, more devastating than American Tabloid, The Cold Six Thousand establishes Ellro

From the Back Cover

In this savagely audacious novel, James Ellroy" plants a pipe bomb under the America in the 1960s, lights the fuse, and watches the shrapnel fly. On November 22, 1963 three men converge in Dallas. Their job: to clean up the JFK hit''s loose ends and inconvenient witnesses. They are Wayne Tedrow, Jr., a Las Vegas cop with family ties to the lunatic right; Ward J. Littell, a defrocked FBI man turned underworld mouthpiece; and Pete Bondurant, a dope-runner and hit-man who serves as the mob''s emissary to the anti-Castro underground.
It goes bad from there. For the next five years these night-riders run a whirlwind of plots and counter-plots: Howard Hughes''s takeover of Vegas, J. Edgar Hoover''s war against the civil rights movement, the heroin trade in Vietnam, and the murders of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Bobby Kennedy. Wilder than "L. A. Confidential, more devastating than "American Tabloid, The Cold Six Thousand establishes Ellroy as one of our most fearless novelists.

About the Author

James Ellroy was born in Los Angeles in 1948. He is the author of the L.A. Quartet: The Black Dahlia, The Big Nowhere, L.A. Confidential, and White Jazz, and the Underworld U.S.A. Trilogy: American Tabloid, The Cold Six Thousand, and Blood’s A Rover. These seven novels have won numerous honors and were international best sellers. He is also the author of two collections, Crime Wave and Destination: Morgue! and two memoirs My Dark Places and The Hilliker Curse.  Ellroy currently lives in Denver, Colorado.

www.jamesellroy.net

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1
Part I
EXTRADITION
November 22-25, 1963
1
Wayne Tedrow Jr.
(Dallas, 11/22/63)
They sent him to Dallas to kill a nigger pimp named Wendell Durfee. He wasn''t sure he could do it.
The Casino Operators Council flew him. They supplied first-class fare. They tapped their slush fund. They greased him. They fed him six cold.
Nobody said it:
Kill that coon. Do it good. Take our hit fee.
The flight ran smooth. A stew served drinks. She saw his gun. She played up. She asked dumb questions.
He said he worked Vegas PD. He ran the intel squad. He built files and logged information.
She loved it. She swooned.
"Hon, what you doin'' in Dallas?"
He told her.
A Negro shivved a twenty-one dealer. The dealer lost an eye. The Negro booked to Big D. She loved it. She brought him highballs. He omitted details.
The dealer provoked the attack. The council issued the contract-death for ADW Two.
The preflight pep talk. Lieutenant Buddy Fritsch:
"I don''t have to tell you what we expect, son. And I don''t have to add that your father expects it, too."
The stew played geisha girl. The stew fluffed her beehive.
"What''s your name?"
"Wayne Tedrow."
She whooped. "You just have to be Junior!"
He looked through her. He doodled. He yawned.
She fawned. She just loooooved his daddy. He flew with her oodles. She knew he was a Mormon wheel. She''d looove to know more.
Wayne laid out Wayne Senior.
He ran a kitchen-help union. He rigged low pay. He had coin. He had pull. He pushed right-wing tracts. He hobnobbed with fat cats. He knew J. Edgar Hoover.
The pilot hit the intercom. Dallas-on time.
The stew fluffed her hair. "I''ll bet you''re staying at the Adolphus."
Wayne cinched his seat belt. "What makes you say that?"
"Well, your daddy told me he always stays there."
"I''m staying there. Nobody consulted me, but that''s where they''ve got me booked."
The stew hunkered down. Her skirt slid. Her garter belt gapped.
"Your daddy told me they''ve got a nice little restaurant right there in the hotel, and, well . . ."
The plane hit rough air. Wayne caught it low. He broke a sweat. He shut his eyes. He saw Wendell Durfee.
The stew touched him. Wayne opened his eyes.
He saw her hickeys. He saw her bad teeth. He smelled her shampoo.
"You were looking a little scared there, Wayne Junior."
"Junior" tore it.
"Leave me alone. I''m not what you want, and I don''t cheat on my wife."
1:50 p.m.
They touched down. Wayne got off first. Wayne stamped blood back into his legs.
He walked to the terminal. Schoolgirls blocked the gate. One girl cried. One girl fucked with prayer beads.
He stepped around them. He followed baggage signs. People walked past him. They looked sucker-punched.
Red eyes. Boo-hoo. Women with Kleenex.
Wayne stopped at baggage claim. Kids whizzed by. They shot cap pistols. They laughed.
A man walked up-Joe Redneck-tall and fat. He wore a Stetson. He wore big boots. He wore a mother-of-pearl .45.
"If you''re Sergeant Tedrow, I''m Officer Maynard D. Moore of the Dallas Police Department."
They shook hands. Moore chewed tobacco. Moore wore cheap cologne. A woman walked by-boo-hoo-hoo-one big red nose.
Wayne said, "What''s wrong?"
Moore smiled. "Some kook shot the President."
Most shops closed early. State flags flew low. Some folks flew rebel flags upright.
Moore drove Wayne in. Moore had a plan: Run by the hotel/get you set in/find us that jigaboo.
John F. Kennedy-dead.
His wife''s crush. His stepmom''s fixation. JFK got Janice wet. Janice told Wayne Senior. Janice paid. Janice limped. Janice showed off the welts on her thighs.
Dead was dead. He couldn''t grab it. He fumbled the rebounds.
Moore chewed Red Man. Moore shot juice out his window. Gunshots overlapped. Joyous shit in the boonies.
Moore said, "Some people ain''t so sad."
Wayne shrugged. They passed a billboard-JFK and the UN.
"You sure ain''t sayin'' much. I got to say that so far, you ain''t the most lively extradition partner I ever had."
A gun went off. Close. Wayne grabbed his holster.
"Whoo! You got a case of the yips, boy!"
Wayne futzed with his necktie. "I just want to get this over with."
Moore ran a red light. "In good time. I don''t doubt that Mr. Durfee''ll be sayin'' hi to our fallen hero before too long."
Wayne rolled up his window. Wayne trapped in Moore''s cologne.
Moore said, "I been to Lost Wages quite a few times. In fact, I owe a big marker at the Dunes this very moment."
Wayne shrugged. They passed a bus bench. A colored girl sobbed.
"I heard of your daddy, too. I heard he''s quite the boy in Nevada."
A truck ran a red. The driver waved a beer and revolver.
"Lots of people know my father. They all tell me they know him, and it gets old pretty quick."
Moore smiled. "Hey, I think I detect a pulse there."
Motorcade confetti. A window sign: Big D loves Jack & Jackie.
"I heard about you, too. I heard you got leanings your daddy don''t much care for."
"For instance?"
"Let''s try nigger lover. Let''s try you chauffeur Sonny Liston around when he comes to Vegas, ''cause the PD''s afraid he''ll get himself in trouble with liquor and white women, and you like him, but you don''t like the nice Italian folks who keep your little town clean."
The car hit a pothole. Wayne hit the dash.
Moore stared at Wayne. Wayne stared back. They held the stare. Moore ran a red. Wayne blinked first.
Moore winked. "We''re gonna have big fun this weekend."
The lobby was swank. The carpets ran thick. Men snagged their boot heels.
People pointed outside-look look look-the motorcade passed the hotel. JFK drove by. JFK waved. JFK bought it close by.
People talked. Strangers braced strangers. The men wore western suits. The women dressed faux-Jackie.
Check-ins swamped the desk. Moore ad-libbed. Moore walked Wayne to the bar.
SRO-big barside numbers.
A TV sat on a table. A barman goosed the sound. Moore shoved up to a phone booth. Wayne scoped the TV out.
Folks jabbered. The men wore hats. Everyone wore boots and high heels. Wayne stood on his toes. Wayne popped over hat brims.
The picture jumped and settled in. Sound static and confusion. Cops. A thin punk. Words: "Oswald"/"weapon"/"Red sympath-"
A guy waved a rifle. Newsmen pressed in. A camera panned. There''s the punk. He''s showing fear and contusions.
The noise was bad. The smoke was thick. Wayne lost his legs.
A man raised a toast. "Oughta give Oswald a-"
Wayne stood down. A woman jostled him-wet cheeks and runny mascara.
Wayne walked to the phone booth. Moore had the door cracked.
He said, "Guy, listen now."
He said, "Wet-nursing some kid on some bullshit extradition-"
"Bullshit" tore it.
Wayne jabbed Moore. Moore swung around. His pant legs hiked up.
Fuck-knives in his boot tops. Brass knucks in one sock.
Wayne said, "Wendell Durfee, remember?"
Moore stood up. Moore got magnetized. Wayne tracked his eyes.
He caught the TV. He caught a caption. He caught a still shot: "Slain Officer J. D. Tippit."
Moore stared. Moore trembled. Moore shook.
Wayne said, "Wendell Durf-"
Moore shoved him. Moore ran outside.
- - -
The council booked him a biggg suite. A bellboy supplied history. JFK loved the suite. JFK fucked women there. Ava Gardner blew him on the terrace.
Two sitting rooms. Two bedrooms. Three TVs. Slush funds. Six cold. Kill that nigger, boy.
Wayne toured the suite. History lives. JFK loved Dallas quail.
He turned the TVs on. He tuned in three channels. He caught the show three ways. He walked between sets. He nailed the story.
The punk was Lee Harvey Oswald. The punk shot JFK and Tippit. Tippit worked Dallas PD. DPD was tight-knit. Moore probably knew him.
Oswald was pro-Red. Oswald loved Fidel. Oswald worked at a schoolbook plant. Oswald clipped the Prez on his lunch break.
DPD had him. Their HQ teemed. Cops. Reporters. Camera hogs all.
Wayne flopped on a couch. Wayne shut his eyes. Wayne saw Wendell Durfee. Wayne opened his eyes. Wayne saw Lee Oswald.
He killed the sound. He pulled his wallet pix.
There''s his mother-back in Peru, Indiana.
She left Wayne Senior. Late ''47. Wayne Senior hit her. He broke bones sometimes.
She asked Wayne who he loved most. He said, "My dad." She slapped him. She cried. She apologized.
The slap tore it. He went with Wayne Senior.
He called his mother-May ''54-he called en route to the Army. She said, "Don''t fight in silly wars." She said, "Don''t hate like Wayne Senior."
He cut her off. Binding/permanent/4-ever.
There''s his stepmom:
Wayne Senior ditched Wayne''s mom. Wayne Senior wooed Janice. Wayne Senior brought Wayne along. Wayne was thirteen. Wayne was horny. Wayne dug on Janice.
Janice Lukens Tedrow made rooms tilt. She played indolent wife. She played scratch golf. She played A-club tennis.
Wayne Senior feared her spark. She watched Wayne grow up. She torched reciprocal. She left her doors open. She invited looks. Wayne Senior knew it. Wayne Senior didn''t care.
There''s his wife:
Lynette Sproul Tedrow. Perched in his lap. Grad night at Brigham Young.
He''s shell-shocked. He got his chem degree-BYU/''59-summa cum laude. He craved action. He joined Vegas PD. Fuck summa cum laude.
He met Lynette in Little Rock. Fall ''57. Central High desegregates. Rednecks. Colored kids. The Eighty-Second Airborne.
Some white boys prowl. Some white boys snatch a colored boy''s sandwich. Lynette hands him hers. The white boys attack. Corporal Wayne Tedrow Jr. counters.
He beats them down. He spears one fuck. The fuck screams, "Mommy!"
Lynette hits on Wayne. She''s seventeen. He''s twenty-three. He''s got some college.
They fucked on a golf course. Sprinklers doused them. He told Janice all.
She said, "You and Lynette peaked early. And you probably liked the fight as much as the sex."
Janice knew him. Janice had the home-court advantage.
Wayne looked out a window. TV crews roamed. News vans double-parked. He walked through the suite. He turned off the TVs. Three Oswalds vanished.
He pulled his file. All carbons: LVPD/Dallas County Sheriff''s.
Durfee, Wendell (NMI). Male Negro/DOB 6-6-27/Clark County, Nevada. 6¢4?/155.
Pander beefs-3/44 up. "Well-known dice-game habitue." No busts outside Vegas and Dallas.
"Known to drive Cadillacs."
"Known to wear flamboyant attire."
"Known to have fathered 13 children out of wedlock."
"Known to pander Negro women, white women, male homosexuals & Mexican transvestites."
Twenty-two pimp busts. Fourteen convictions. Nine child-support liens. Five bail jumps.
Cop notes: Wendell''s smart/Wendell''s dumb/Wendell cut that cat at Binion''s.
The cat was mobbed up. The cat shanked Wendell first. The council set policy. The LVPD enforced it.
"Known Dallas County Associates":
Marvin Duquesne Settle/male Negro/Texas State custody.
Fenton "Duke" Price/male Negro/Texas State custody.
Alfonzo John Jefferson/male Negro/4219 Wilmington Road, Dallas 8, Tex. "Gambling partner of Wendell Durfee."
County Probation: (Stat. 92.04 Tex. St. Code) 9/14/60-9/14/65. Employed: Dr Pepper Bottling Plant. Note: "Subject to make fine payments for term of probation, i.e.: every 3rd Friday (Dr Pepper payday) County Prob Off."
Donnell George Lundy/male Negro/Texas State custody.
Manuel "Bobo" Herrara/male Mexican/Texas State custody.
The phone rang. Wayne grabbed it.
"Yeah?"
"It''s me, son. Your new best buddy."
Wayne grabbed his holster. "Where are you?"
"Right now I''m noplace worth bein''. But you meet me at eight o''clock."
"Where?"
"The Carousel Club. You be there, and we''ll find us that burrhead."
Wayne hung up. Wayne got butterflies.
Wendell, I don''t want to kill you.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.3 out of 54.3 out of 5
348 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

James
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good Book
Reviewed in the United States on December 9, 2020
I''d give it 5 stars except he misses a few things. First, the book is very interesting from the historical side and it is suspenseful. On the downside he just glosses over the Diem assassination, which got the whole heroin business going. If you are interested in this... See more
I''d give it 5 stars except he misses a few things. First, the book is very interesting from the historical side and it is suspenseful. On the downside he just glosses over the Diem assassination, which got the whole heroin business going. If you are interested in this time period, read up on Diem who got whacked 3 weeks before JFK, and then the heroin started flowing. Also, Meyer Laskey doesn''t appear in the book. He was the Syndicate Godfather taking over after Lucky, and he''s the one who owned Cuba. He''s the jew mafia boss in Godfather II. A Laskey capo was David Yaras. It was his crew that Jack Ruby belonged to. In the book Ruby is shown as a pious jew club owner. The only thing jewish about Ruby was that he belonged to the jewish mob. He was a dirt ball enforcer for Yaras, not a pious jew. I''m wondering if the author was warned off on Laskey.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Eric
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I liked it. I''ve read almost all of James Ellroy''s ...
Reviewed in the United States on May 22, 2015
Not for the faint of heart. A novel based on some real events and some fictional events and a mixture of real people and the author''s characters (no doubt based on real people). Its actually the second book in a trilogy,and it can stand alone as a complete story. It... See more
Not for the faint of heart. A novel based on some real events and some fictional events and a mixture of real people and the author''s characters (no doubt based on real people). Its actually the second book in a trilogy,and it can stand alone as a complete story.
It includes some rough language and some rough activities. But at the end of the day its one heck of a read. I liked it. I''ve read almost all of James Ellroy''s books and enjoyed them all. If you are interested I suggest starting with some of his early writing and then advance as he polishes his skills an author. And in my book he is one heck of an author.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
whistler
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not up to the LA trilogy.
Reviewed in the United States on December 8, 2020
Elroy''s a ground-breaking crime author, in style, content and chutzpah...this book isn''t up to his usual standard, however. The characters, a couple of whom were in previous novels, are flat and I never really became engaged with the story. Hope his next is back on form!
Helpful
Report
Mil
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Reading some passages of James Elroy''s novel can seem like a slap in the face
Reviewed in the United States on June 19, 2015
Fast paced, brutal, and uncompromising.Reading some passages of James Elroy''s novel can seem like a slap in the face. The author draws the reader into a world of ruthless movers and shakers that are behind the headlines and events swirling around John Kennedy''s,... See more
Fast paced, brutal, and uncompromising.Reading some passages of James Elroy''s novel can seem like a slap in the face. The author draws the reader into a world of ruthless movers and shakers that are behind the headlines and events swirling around John Kennedy''s, BobbyKennedy''s and Martin Luther King''s assasinations, Howard Hughes obsession with buying Los Vegas, and the drug trade from Vietnam. Whether you believe all the suppositions and subterfuge, this book is impossible to put down once you start..
8 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Dave Goldberg
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I get it. I got it ...
Reviewed in the United States on June 20, 2001
No commas. A world record. Just 47 commas in 672 pages. Not 700 pages. Some would have you believe that. Not so. 672 pages. The few commas could be colons. As in "Somebody yelled, ''limos!Somebody yelled, ''Him.'' '''' No. Not that "Him.'''' Howard Hughes, who... See more
No commas. A world record. Just 47 commas in 672 pages. Not 700 pages. Some would have you believe that. Not so. 672 pages. The few commas could be colons. As in "Somebody yelled, ''limos!Somebody yelled, ''Him.'' ''''
No. Not that "Him.'''' Howard Hughes, who thought of himself as more powerful than that "Him.''''
But seriously.
I''ve been an Ellroy fan since "Black Dahlia, and the rest of the LA Noir series, which was actually written in prose, not stacatto. But after being originally turned off by his new style in "White Jazz,'''' I''ve gotten used to it. And once you get by it, both this "novel'''' and "American Tabloid'''' become a brutal and (perhaps) fairly accurate portrayal of the late ''50s and ''60s. (At least Oliver Stone would think so.
The best of Ellroy''s heroes have always been flawed. But this bunch outdoes them. I''m not sure how he generates sympathy for a corrupt ex-FBI man and mob lawyer or a stone anti-Castro killer, but he manages. My feeling: Compared to J. Edgar, the real-life figure around whom the book revolves, they''re up front about who and what they are. Hoover never was.
Overall: worth reading if you can get through 672 pages with just 47 commas.
7 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Stephen McLeod
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Raises the Bar for American Fiction
Reviewed in the United States on May 24, 2001
First a suggestion, then a rant: Don''t read this book out of order. Read *American Tabloid* first. Absolutely read this book. But read *Tabloid* first. Now the rant: People say this book''s hard to read. You know what? People didn''t like *Ulysses* either.... See more
First a suggestion, then a rant: Don''t read this book out of order. Read *American Tabloid* first. Absolutely read this book. But read *Tabloid* first. Now the rant:

People say this book''s hard to read. You know what? People didn''t like *Ulysses* either. They said it was "hard to read." *Ulysses* wasn''t hard to read and this book is way easier to read than *Ulysses*. It''s hard to encompass. It''s hard to reduce to the comfortable categories of the Modern Langauge Association''s Rule of Law, or what the book reviewer in the New York Times sanctions as "responsible" to "history," an annoying observation, as it could just as easily be applied to, oh I don''t know, Shakespeare for example. It''s hard to compare because there''s nothing to compare it too. This book swings. It shifts. It swells and crests and dips like angry surf. This book is fun to read.

Some people also think the book was underedited. The book is not underedited. That''s what some said (and some still say)about *Tristan and Isolde* and Charlie Parker: Too many notes. Nonsense. Which notes would they have cut? Who would they have chosen to cut them?

Some people compare this book to Ellroy''s other books and give it a thumbs-up or a thumbs-down. This book transcends thumbs-up/thumbs-down criticism. That sort of thing works, maybe, for the lightweights that pass for literati of our time. Does anybody REALLY think that school kids are going to be reading Richard Ford 50 years hence? John (zzzzzzz...) Updike? Some voices will not be compared, categorized, or successfully evaluated, in short, because they are too furious, too fine.

Both reading and making fiction are moral acts. Daring to face the darkness qualifies one to talk about the light. An interesting point made, not by the New York Times but in the Sunday Times Book Review, is that Ellroy doesn''t really fit the category of "noir" because, ultimately, he''s too tender and even hyper-sensitive to he humanity of his characters, too willing to find the soft-spots in the midst of the brutality that is the wallpaper of Ellroy''s visionary world. Leaving aside the problem of trying to fit this writer into categories, it''s a good observation. Ellroy, *de profundis*, shows an affirming flame. Look for it in lives crushed by horror, in the street, in the hope against hope trhough which all of Ellroy''s characters do what they do, however driven they are, however completely they fail.

Readers think they have to "get" Ellroy. Reviewers especially. They want to justify their existence by pretending they can evaluate a vision this large. But Ellroy won''t be got. The fallacy that necessarily informs a critic''s explanation or evaluation of Ellroy is that she comprehends the work. That her vision is large enough to accomodate his and pass on it. I haven''t encountered that critic yet.

Get a first edition while you still can. This book''s going to be around for a long long time.
11 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Jacob Dyer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I liked the old Ellroy better.
Reviewed in the United States on May 31, 2001
I read American Tabloid. I was astonished. I lusted for the sequal. I waited. The sequal was published. I bought the sequal. I read the sequal. I was slightly disappointed. It''s another great, intricately plotted crime novel from James Ellroy. The only... See more
I read American Tabloid. I was astonished. I lusted for the sequal. I waited.
The sequal was published. I bought the sequal. I read the sequal.
I was slightly disappointed.
It''s another great, intricately plotted crime novel from James Ellroy. The only thing keeping it from reaching classic Ellroy status is Ellroy''s prose. It''s ultra-repetitive and annoying. At times I felt like I was reading a really twisted children''s book.
An example: "He ran a kitchen-help union. He rigged low pay. He had coin. He had pull. He pushed right-wing tracts. He hobnobbed with fat cats. He knew J. Edgar Hoover."
Ellroy keeps this up for the entire book. Too bad. I wish he''d stop experimenting with style so much and focus on creating killer stories and characters. It''s what he does best. There were times when I actually was able to put the book down without trouble, unusual when I''m reading Ellroy. Still, its well worth putting up with Ellroy''s quirks for another wild ride through the dark underbelly of american history.
4 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
trevor
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I have to say I think this is my favorite James Ellroy novel
Reviewed in the United States on March 22, 2015
I have to say I think this is my favorite James Ellroy novel. I galloped through the LA quadrilogy and then very nearly before I regained my nerve, I leaped back into the hell hole of the 1960s as depicted here-in . Crazy shenanigans abound , huge swaths of similarly minded... See more
I have to say I think this is my favorite James Ellroy novel. I galloped through the LA quadrilogy and then very nearly before I regained my nerve, I leaped back into the hell hole of the 1960s as depicted here-in . Crazy shenanigans abound , huge swaths of similarly minded brutal characters romp, rock, roll rampage, and rollick on every note in this raucous symphony. gallons of blood , drool, semen, and other wet surprises soak through the bindings of this book. If you havent read the 1st book in the serious, then dont bother applying to Mr Ellroys school of hard-knocks quite yet.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Graham G Grant
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One. Hell. Of A. Thriller. (Shame about the short sentences)
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 9, 2019
American Tabloid was a sweeping, obsessive, paranoid, engrossing epic; its sequel contains similar ingredients, hypothesising that JFK’s murder wasn’t the only assassination in US history engineered by a shadowy cabal of espionage and organised crime co-conspirators. The...See more
American Tabloid was a sweeping, obsessive, paranoid, engrossing epic; its sequel contains similar ingredients, hypothesising that JFK’s murder wasn’t the only assassination in US history engineered by a shadowy cabal of espionage and organised crime co-conspirators. The sentences are shorter, meaning this novel is even more highly stylised than Tabloid and other Ellroy titles; this was the first novel of his where I felt the style and the ultra-brief sentences largely worked against the flow of the narrative. That said, the story is irresistible - elaborately plotted and involving many of the key protagonists from Tabloid. It helps to have some background knowledge of the era from 1963-68 and in particular Vietnam/Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King. But as always Ellroy educates: weaving fact and fiction in an extraordinary, dazzling tapestry. My overall impression is that the Vietnam/post-JFK period doesn’t work quite as well as the backdrop for Tabloid, and that (heretically) I would like to read a version of the story written more conventionally (with sentences averaging more than four words). I’m a big Ellroy fan and I’ve heard him say Cold Six Thousand is the most radical example of his short sentence style - they’re getting longer in his later work. I’ll give it a while before tackling the last novel in the trilogy - Blood’s A Rover. But there’s no denying the scale of the accomplishment here, and the economy of prose does sometimes work extremely well - painting a vivid picture of Vietnam, for example, in brutally short sentences, where other authors would’ve taken several pages. Tabloid bowled me over, but Cold Six Thousand, while far from a failure, was more of a slog, and at times it left me, well, slightly cold...
3 people found this helpful
Report
Robert Bull
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Cold Six Thousand
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 4, 2017
I find it hard to write a review of this book as at times I found it so confusing. Quickly changing scenarios happening in America,Vietnam and Cuba plus a long list of some crazy mixed up characters both fictional and real.Having said that I found it brilliant and...See more
I find it hard to write a review of this book as at times I found it so confusing. Quickly changing scenarios happening in America,Vietnam and Cuba plus a long list of some crazy mixed up characters both fictional and real.Having said that I found it brilliant and extraordinary.In summing up I have to say this is probably one of the top two or three books I have ever read and would highly recommend it to everyone.
3 people found this helpful
Report
North Yorkshire
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great sequel to American Tabloid
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 30, 2020
This is a sequel and given the clipped writing style it makes sense to read American Tabloid first. I can vouch for this! The first 50 pages contain lots of references to American Tabloid but they are so compressed as to make no sense without knowledge of the book. Chapter...See more
This is a sequel and given the clipped writing style it makes sense to read American Tabloid first. I can vouch for this! The first 50 pages contain lots of references to American Tabloid but they are so compressed as to make no sense without knowledge of the book. Chapter 19 includes a summary of the early volume that, again, does not get you up to speed if you aren''t already aware of what it refers to. I bailed out of this book a few years ago because I got lost. Then recently I read American Tabloid and moved straight on to this and I love it. I like the terse/abrupt style - hard-boiled+. It is a step-up from American Tabloid. I find the Kennedy-assassination aftermath more gripping than Ellroy''s lead-up to the event (though American Tabloid is a great book). It''s not quite my favourite - that''s Perfidia - but it is up there. I recommend it.
Report
Barduchas
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Like Raymond Chandler on LSD and with hiccups
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 19, 2019
The book was delivered promptly, but I found it unreadable. The machine-gun style of delivery (which I imagined would be confined to the first chapter) continues for the whole book. This unpleasant, jerky, syncopated presentation makes for a challenging, pretentious read,...See more
The book was delivered promptly, but I found it unreadable. The machine-gun style of delivery (which I imagined would be confined to the first chapter) continues for the whole book. This unpleasant, jerky, syncopated presentation makes for a challenging, pretentious read, although I did finish it. I am surprised that Ellroy had the persistence to carry it through to the end. And I wonder why he bothered.
4 people found this helpful
Report
Kevan James
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Ultimately Satisfying!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 25, 2017
I enjoyed the first novel in this trilogy very much but I found this second volume to be much harder work. Other reviewers have commented on the strange clipped, repetitive style Ellroy uses in this book. I would agree that it can make the book difficult to read but there''s...See more
I enjoyed the first novel in this trilogy very much but I found this second volume to be much harder work. Other reviewers have commented on the strange clipped, repetitive style Ellroy uses in this book. I would agree that it can make the book difficult to read but there''s something almost poetic about it that, ultimately, left me satisfied! I look forward to starting the final installment!
2 people found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • history of las vegas
  • cuba''s culture
  • gifts from cuba

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online

The Cold outlet sale Six high quality Thousand online