Spinning Silver: online A wholesale Novel sale

Spinning Silver: online A wholesale Novel sale

Spinning Silver: online A wholesale Novel sale
Spinning Silver: online A wholesale Novel sale__after
Spinning Silver: online A wholesale Novel sale__front

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Product Description

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “One of the year’s strongest fantasy novels” (NPR), an imaginative retelling of the Rumpelstiltskin fairy tale from the bestselling author of Uprooted.

NEBULA AND HUGO AWARD FINALIST • NAMED ONE OF PASTES BEST FANTASY BOOKS OF THE DECADE • NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • NPR • Time • Tordotcom • Popsugar • Vox • Vulture  Paste • Bustle • Library Journal

With the Nebula Award–winning  Uprooted, Naomi Novik opened a brilliant new chapter in an already acclaimed career, delving into the magic of fairy tales to craft a love story that was both timeless and utterly of the now.  Spinning Silver draws readers deeper into this glittering realm of fantasy, where the boundary between wonder and terror is thinner than a breath, and safety can be stolen as quickly as a kiss.

Miryem is the daughter and granddaughter of moneylenders, but her father’s inability to collect his debts has left his family on the edge of poverty—until Miryem takes matters into her own hands. Hardening her heart, the young woman sets out to claim what is owed and soon gains a reputation for being able to turn silver into gold. When an ill-advised boast draws the attention of the king of the Staryk—grim fey creatures who seem more ice than flesh—Miryem’s fate, and that of two kingdoms, will be forever altered. She will face an impossible challenge and, along with two unlikely allies, uncover a secret that threatens to consume the lands of humans and Staryk alike.

Praise for Spinning Silver

“A perfect tale . . . A big and meaty novel, rich in both ideas and people, with the vastness of Tolkien and the empathy and joy in daily life of Le Guin.” The New York Times Book Review

“Gorgeous, complex, and magical . . . This is the kind of book that one might wish to inhabit forever.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Cool and clever and . . . dire and wonderful.” —Laini Taylor, author of Strange the Dreamer

“The Rumpelstiltskin fairy tale has never been as captivating. . . .  Spinning Silver further cements [Novik’s] place as one of the genre greats.” Paste

Review

“A perfect tale . . . This book is about the determination and quiet competence of women doing remarkable things without knowing first that they can do them. . . . A big and meaty novel, rich in both ideas and people, with the vastness of Tolkien and the empathy and joy in daily life of Le Guin.” The New York Times Book Review

“Gorgeous, complex, and magical . . . This is the kind of book that one might wish to inhabit forever.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Cool and clever and . . . dire and wonderful.” —Laini Taylor, author of Strange the Dreamer

“A book as cool and mysterious as a winter’s night, with two marvelous heroines at its heart,  Spinning Silver pits the cold of endless winter against the fires of duty, love, and sacrifice. I couldn’t put it down.” —Katherine Arden, New York Times bestselling author of The Bear and the Nightingale

“Masterly . . . Novik addresses weighty questions of power, choice, prejudice, beauty, and identity with aplomb.” Library Journal (starred review)

“Naomi Novik knows how to weave words into magic, and  Spinning Silver enchants the reader from the first page. This magnificent tale of three courageous young women who find the power to change their fates will catch you in its spell and linger long after the last chapter is read.” —Christina Henry, bestselling author of The Mermaid

“A brilliant reclamation of ‘Rumpelstiltskin,’ digging deep into that story’s anti-Semitism and pulling up something nourishing from the roots . . . One of the year’s strongest fantasy novels . . . I’m in awe of how Novik spins moldy, hateful straw into warm and glimmering gold.” —Amal El-Mohtar, NPR

“A thoughtful, emotionally complex, absorbing drama.” Kirkus Reviews

“Novik has a knack for creating richly layered fantasy worlds with complex social dynamics, ruthless rulers and epic plot twists; her poetic narratives often recast magical motifs in unexpected ways. . . . This one, a stand-alone retelling of the Brothers Grimm’s ‘Rumpelstiltskin,’ includes a feminist exploration of the politics of money.” Newsweek

“The Rumpelstiltskin fairy tale has never been as captivating. . . . Spinning Silver further cements [Novik’s] place as one of the genre greats.” Paste

“Deftly woven and highly immersive.” Tordotcom

“An inventive retelling.” Bustle

“A stroke of genius . . . Novik’s characters are compelling, and the moral choices they are faced with are genuinely difficult. . . . Her tone can move from gently humorous, to sweepingly epic, to piercingly sad easily, and back again. . . . Even better than Uprooted.” Locus

Spinning Silver follows in the tradition set by Robin McKinley of fairy-tale worlds populated by fairy-tale characters who feel like real people, and of princesses with strength and agency. But it moves the tradition forward.” Vox

About the Author

Naomi Novik received the 2007 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer at the World Science Fiction Convention. In 2016 she won the Nebula Award for Best Novel for Uprooted. She is also the author of the nine volumes of the Temeraire series and the graphic novel Will Supervillains Be on the Final? An avid reader of fantasy literature, Novik is also a history buff with a particular interest in the Napoleonic era and a fondness for the work of Patrick O’Brian and Jane Austen. She lives in New York City with her family and six computers.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

��hapter 1

The real story isn’t half as pretty as the one you’ve heard. The real story is, the miller’s daughter with her long golden hair wants to catch a lord, a prince, a rich man’s son, so she goes to the moneylender and borrows for a ring and a necklace and decks herself out for the festival. And she’s beautiful enough, so the lord, the prince, the rich man’s son notices her, and dances with her, and tumbles her in a quiet hayloft when the dancing is over, and afterwards he goes home and marries the rich woman his family has picked out for him. Then the miller’s despoiled daughter tells everyone that the moneylender’s in league with the devil, and the village runs him out or maybe even stones him, so at least she gets to keep the jewels for a dowry, and the blacksmith marries her before that firstborn child comes along a little early.

Because that’s what the story’s really about: getting out of paying your debts. That’s not how they tell it, but I knew. My father was a moneylender, you see.

He wasn’t very good at it. If someone didn’t pay him back on time, he never so much as mentioned it to them. Only if our cupboards were really bare, or our shoes were falling off our feet, and my mother spoke quietly with him after I was in bed, then he’d go, unhappy, and knock on a few doors, and make it sound like an apology when he asked for some of what they owed. And if there was money in the house and someone asked to borrow, he hated to say no, even if we didn’t really have enough ourselves. So all his money, most of which had been my mother’s money, her dowry, stayed in other people’s houses. And everyone else liked it that way, even though they knew they ought to be ashamed of themselves, so they told the story often, even or especially when I could hear it.

My mother’s father was a moneylender, too, but he was a very good one. He lived in Vysnia, forty miles away by the pitted old trading road that dragged from village to village like a string full of small dirty knots. Mama often took me on visits, when she could afford a few pennies to pay someone to let us ride along at the back of a peddler’s cart or a sledge, five or six changes along the way. Sometimes we caught glimpses of the other road through the trees, the one that belonged to the Staryk, gleaming like the top of the river in winter when the snow had blown clear. “Don’t look, Miryem,” my mother would tell me, but I always kept watching it out of the corner of my eye, hoping to keep it near, because it meant a quicker journey: whoever was driving the cart would slap the horses and hurry them up until it vanished again.

One time, we heard the hooves behind us as they came off their road, a sound like ice cracking, and the driver beat the horses quick to get the cart behind a tree, and we all huddled there in the well of the wagon among the sacks, my mother’s arm wrapped around my head, holding it down so I couldn’t be tempted to take a look. They rode past us and did not stop. It was a poor peddler’s cart, covered in dull tin pots, and Staryk knights only ever came riding for gold. The hooves went jangling past, and a knife-­wind blew over us, so when I sat up the end of my thin braid was frosted white, and all of my mother’s sleeve where it wrapped around me, and our backs. But the frost faded, and as soon as it was gone, the peddler said to my mother, “Well, that’s enough of a rest, isn’t it,” as if he didn’t remember why we had stopped.

“Yes,” my mother said, nodding, as if she didn’t remember either, and he got back up onto the driver’s seat and clucked to the horses and set us going again. I was young enough to remember it afterwards a little, and not old enough to care about the Staryk as much as about the ordinary cold biting through my clothes, and my pinched stomach. I didn’t want to say anything that might make the cart stop again, impatient to get to the city and my grandfather’s house.

My grandmother would always have a new dress for me, plain and dull brown but warm and well-­made, and each winter a pair of new leather shoes that didn’t pinch my feet and weren’t patched and cracked around the edges. She would feed me to bursting three times every day, and the last night before we left she would always make cheesecake, her cheesecake, which was baked golden on the outside and thick and white and crumbly inside and tasted just a little bit of apples, and she would make decorations with sweet golden raisins on the top. After I had slowly and lingeringly eaten every last bite of a slice wider than the palm of my hand, they would put me to bed upstairs, in the big cozy bedroom where my mother and her sisters had slept as girls, in the same narrow wooden bed carved with doves. My mother would sit next to her mother by the fireplace, and put her head on her shoulder. They wouldn’t speak, but when I was a little older and didn’t fall asleep right away, I would see in the firelight glow that both of them had a little wet track of tears down their faces.

We could have stayed. There was room in my grandfather’s house, and welcome for us. But we always went home, because we loved my father. He was terrible with money, but he was endlessly warm and gentle, and he tried to make up for his failings: he spent nearly all of every day out in the cold woods hunting for food and firewood, and when he was indoors there was nothing he wouldn’t do to help my mother. No talk of woman’s work in my house, and when we did go hungry, he went hungriest, and snuck food from his plate to ours. When he sat by the fire in the evenings, his hands were always working, whittling some new little toy for me or something for my mother, a decoration on a chair or a wooden spoon.

But winter was always long and bitter, and every year I was old enough to remember was worse than the one before. Our town was unwalled and half nameless; some people said it was called Pakel, for being near the road, and those who didn’t like that, because it reminded them of being near the Staryk road, would shout them down and say it was called Pavys, for being near the river, but no one bothered to put it on a map, so no decision was ever made. When we spoke, we all only called it town. It was welcome to travelers, a third of the way between Vysnia and Minask, and a small river crossed the road running from east to west. Many farmers brought their goods by boat, so our market day was busy. But that was the limit of our importance. No lord concerned himself very much with us, and the tsar in Koron not at all. I could not have told you whom the tax collector worked for until on one visit to my grandfather’s house I learned accidentally that the Duke of Vysnia was angry because the receipts from our town had been creeping steadily down year to year. The cold kept stealing out of the woods earlier and earlier, eating at our crops.

And the year I turned sixteen, the Staryk came, too, during what should have been the last week of autumn, before the late barley was all the way in. They had always come raiding for gold, once in a while; people told stories of half-­remembered glimpses, and the dead they left behind. But over the last seven years, as the winters worsened, they had grown more rapacious. There were still a few leaves clinging to the trees when they rode off their road and onto ours, and they went only ten miles past our village to the rich monastery down the road, and there they killed a dozen of the monks and stole the golden candlesticks, and the golden cup, and all the icons painted in gilt, and carried away that golden treasure to whatever kingdom lay at the end of their own road.

The ground froze solid that night with their passing, and every day after that a sharp steady wind blew out of the forest carrying whirls of stinging snow. Our own little house stood apart and at the very end of town, without other walls nearby to share in breaking the wind, and we grew ever more thin and hungry and shivering. My father kept making his excuses, avoiding the work he couldn’t bear to do. But even when my mother finally pressed him and he tried, he only came back with a scant handful of coins, and said in apology for them, “It’s a bad winter. A hard winter for everyone,” when I didn’t believe they’d even bothered to make him that much of an excuse. I walked through town the next day to take our loaf to the baker, and I heard women who owed us money talking of the feasts they planned to cook, the treats they would buy in the market. It was coming on midwinter. They all wanted to have something good on the table; something special for the festival, their festival.

So they had sent my father away empty-­handed, and their lights shone out on the snow and the smell of roasting meat slipped out of the cracks while I walked slowly back to the baker, to give him a worn penny in return for a coarse half-­burned loaf that hadn’t been the loaf I’d made at all. He’d given a good loaf to one of his other customers, and kept a ruined one for us. At home my mother was making thin cabbage soup and scrounging together used cooking oil to light the lamp for the third night of our own celebration, coughing as she worked: another deep chill had rolled in from the woods, and it crept through every crack and eave of our run-­down little house. We only had the flames lit for a few minutes before a gust of it came in and blew them out, and my father said, “Well, perhaps that means it’s time for bed,” instead of relighting them, because we were almost out of oil.

By the eighth day, my mother was too tired from coughing to get out of bed at all. “She’ll be all right soon,” my father said, avoiding my eyes. “This cold will break soon. It’s been so long already.” He was whittling candles out of wood, little narrow sticks to burn, because we’d used the last drops of oil the night before. There wasn’t going to be any miracle of light in our house.

He went out to scrounge under the snow for some more firewood. Our box was getting low, too. “Miryem,” my mother said, hoarsely, after he left. I took her a cup of weak tea with a scraping of honey, all I had to comfort her. She sipped a little and lay back on the pillows and said, “When the winter breaks, I want you to go to my father’s house. He’ll take you to my father’s house.”

The last time we had visited my grandfather, one night my mother’s sisters had come to dinner with their husbands and their children. They all wore dresses made of thick wool, and they left fur cloaks in the entryway, and had gold rings on their hands, and gold bracelets. They laughed and sang and the whole room was warm, though it had been deep in winter, and we ate fresh bread and roast chicken and hot golden soup full of flavor and salt, steam rising into my face. When my mother spoke, I inhaled all the warmth of that memory with her words, and longed for it with my cold hands curled into painful knots. I thought of going there to stay, a beggar girl, leaving my father alone and my mother’s gold forever in our neighbors’ houses.

I pressed my lips together hard, and then I kissed her forehead and told her to rest, and after she fell fitfully asleep, I went to the box next to the fireplace where my father kept his big ledger-­book. I took it out and I took his worn pen out of its holder, and I mixed ink out of the ashes in the fireplace and I made a list. A moneylender’s daughter, even a bad moneylender’s daughter, learns her numbers. I wrote and figured and wrote and figured, interest and time broken up by all the little haphazard scattered payments. My father had every one carefully written down, as scrupulous with all of them as no one else ever was with him. And when I had my list finished, I took all the knitting out of my bag, put my shawl on, and went out into the cold morning.

I went to every house that owed us, and I banged on their doors. It was early, very early, still dark, because my mother’s coughing had woken us in the night. Everyone was still at home. So the men opened the doors and stared at me in surprise, and I looked them in their faces and said, cold and hard, “I’ve come to settle your account.”

They tried to put me off, of course; some of them laughed at me. Oleg, the carter with his big hands, closed them into fists and put them on his hips and stared at me while his small squirrelish wife kept her head down over the fire, darting eyes towards me. Kajus, who had borrowed two gold pieces the year before I was born, and did a good custom in the krupnik he brewed in the big copper kettles he’d bought with the money, smiled at me and asked me to come inside and warm myself up, have a hot drink. I refused. I didn’t want to be warmed. I stood on their doorsteps, and I brought out my list, and I told them how much they had borrowed, and what little they had paid, and how much interest they owed besides.

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QueenKatieMae
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Strong women, ancient folklore, family values and a frozen magical kingdom.
Reviewed in the United States on July 10, 2018
Beautifully written, with an intricately woven storyline and filled with strong characters, Spinning Silver is, in my eyes, Naomi Novik''s best novel amongst her many other masterpieces. With her command of the written word this writer is a master storyteller; she is able to... See more
Beautifully written, with an intricately woven storyline and filled with strong characters, Spinning Silver is, in my eyes, Naomi Novik''s best novel amongst her many other masterpieces. With her command of the written word this writer is a master storyteller; she is able to spin together lovely sentences and create an exquisite narrative. Her richly developed characters are flawed, fallible, and the reader cannot help but fall in love with them. Her motifs are multilayered and allusive. With this being said, her books are always a fabulous treat.

Spinning Silver is a story about value and love and family, and how much we are willing to trade, or sacrifice, for what we need, or who we love. An embroidered apron may earn a kopek in the market or it can be traded for a loaf of bread and a bottle of cooking oil. An unwed virgin daughter, a priceless commodity, can be traded away in marriage by her farmer father for a pig. A duke''s daughter is worthy of trade for a chest of gold, or a political alliance. But, saving your people, your family, you and yours, is equal to the price of your soul.

Although there are six narratives in this story, the 3 strongest are the moneylender Miryem; Wanda, the farmer''s daughter; and Irina, the daughter of the duke. When a fourth was added about one-third of the way through the book it was a little jarring, but this turned out to be an important voice. The last two voices expose parts of the story for the readers what the others cannot. Thankfully the writer has an icon representing each voice at the beginning of their narrative otherwise it would be confusing.

Miryem wants to provide and protect her family and so becomes what her father could not: a moneylender that collects. She is clever and resourceful and with tenacity and a strength that developed after years of second citizen treatment because her family is Jewish, Miryem tells the villagers she expects them to pay their debts. Some begrudgingly pay a few pennies at a time or with food or household goods; the farmer gives Miryem his daughter, Wanda, to work as an indentured servant until his drinking and gambling debt is paid off. This deal creates a strong relationship and in turn is the basis of the one of the most touching storylines in the book.

Proud of her ability to provide for her family, Miryem makes a prideful boast that is overheard by the Staryk, magical wintry creatures that control the forest lands, raid the villages and coat the land with snow every season. To protect her family, she unwillingly makes a deal with the Staryk king and agrees to an impossible task.

To Irina''s father, the duke, she has little value; she is not beautiful enough to catch a wealthy husband nor is she a son who can carry on his name. A fortuitous meeting between the duke and Miryem changes all that. Irina becomes her father''s pawn to win the tsar. But it also brings out an ancient and deadly power. To fight this, another bargain is struck, a formidable bargain.

Throughout the book there is the beauty of the Staryk''s frozen kingdom, a glass mountain, a Jewish wedding under the forest sky, a family that finds a love they never knew, reindeer with fangs, a tree that listens, mirrors that bring sanctuary, a crown that gives its wearer beauty and power, silver that becomes gold, three questions, hidden names, and a magic house; each brings its own value, its own cost, its own sacrifice.

And that ending.

This is an incredible book with a gorgeous cover that I highly recommend. Like Novik''s other masterpiece, Uprooted, it is a standalone and you do not need to read her other works. But, you would be missing out if you didn''t.
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James Tepper
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Outstanding original fairy tale of love and magic by a master wordsmith
Reviewed in the United States on July 27, 2018
SPINNING SILVER: A NOVEL is not my usual type of read. I read mostly hard SF, horror and some fantasy (Neil Gaiman, for instance). I had never heard of Naomi Novik, the author before, but the description that I read in a recent review in Locus (a Science Fiction/Fantasy... See more
SPINNING SILVER: A NOVEL is not my usual type of read. I read mostly hard SF, horror and some fantasy (Neil Gaiman, for instance). I had never heard of Naomi Novik, the author before, but the description that I read in a recent review in Locus (a Science Fiction/Fantasy periodical) made me cough up the $13 bucks and give it a try. Boy am I glad I did.

SPINNING SILVER is absolutely outstanding in every way. Totally original (no, it''s not a retelling of Rumpelstiltskin, regardless of what you might see elsewhere), extremely well-written, fascinating and worth every penny that I paid. It is written in such a way that it is suitable for everyone from children to YA to adults. No sex, no profanity (I can''t remember the last time I read a G-rated novel) but gripping and thrilling nonetheless.

The story is set in a fictional word meant to evoke images of Russia and is told from the viewpoints of several different main characters. Miryem, the daughter of a Jewish moneylender whose family is relatively poor because her father is too nice to collect debts owed him, Wanda, the daughter of a loathsome drunk who beats her who goes to work for Miryem''s family to pay off her father''s drinking debt and her younger brothers, Sergey and Stepon, Irina, daughter of a minor noble who hopes to marry Irina off to the Tsar, and Magreta, Irina''s lifelong nurse. All live in a land locked in a brutal winter that is somehow maintained by the mysterious Staryk.

Each segment of each chapter alternates as a first person description of events among those 5 main characters. It was a bit disconcerting at first when the reader is not expecting the narrator to change constantly and before we get to know the different personalities. But Novik is a clever writer that gives everyone a distinct and and different voice so before very long, the constant point of view alternation becomes second nature.

Unlike my usual reviews, I am not going to even attempt to summarize plot more than the description of the principals above. It''s too complex (but easy to follow because of Novik''s great writing chops) and I wouldn''t want to spoil any of the many twists and turns. Suffice it to say that it is a tale of love and magic an one just has to read it to understand.

Very Highly Recommended.

JM Tepper
119 people found this helpful
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K. Cash
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Didn’t Meet My Tastes
Reviewed in the United States on September 21, 2018
Too many minor characters filling up the book with multiple points of view. All in first person perspective. Sometimes these multiple points of view are happening concurrently, sometimes they seem to be occurring before or after some other character’s. This makes things... See more
Too many minor characters filling up the book with multiple points of view. All in first person perspective. Sometimes these multiple points of view are happening concurrently, sometimes they seem to be occurring before or after some other character’s. This makes things confusing.
Along a similar vein, the author mixes descriptions of present events with past events — in the same paragraph — and this also made things confusing.
Sometimes there is too much detail paid to events that aren’t important, and too little paid to those that are.
Also, I do not like the use of language. I do not like that the author describes a certain character’s words as “tasting like old rotten acorns” in her mouth. This provides no insight into the character’s emotions, it instills no relatable feelings in myself as a reader; it only paints an unpleasant image of someone eating rotten acorns.
Speaking of relatability, none of the characters in this story felt sincere or natural. There are too many moments of, “I don’t know why I’m going to do this but I will” because that’s the action the character needs to take to advance the story. They said catchy things during important moments. Every action they made fit what the scene needed in a cleanly calculated way. Obviously characters in a book aren’t real, and all their decisions are dictated by the author. But it’s important that there be maintained at least the illusion of freedom of will for the characters, otherwise everything ends up feeling a bit stale and hollow.
This might sound like it should be leading to a one star review, but there are points about it that I enjoyed — otherwise I wouldn’t have finished it. The setting is nice, albeit a bit scrambled. There are clever moments and the conclusion tied everything together in a neat and clever way. The writing is solid; but I’m just not a fan of the style.
Put simply, I just have particular tastes and this book didn’t meet them.
45 people found this helpful
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Plamen Nenchev
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Naomi Does It Again
Reviewed in the United States on October 9, 2018
This is the ultimate proof that Uprooted was not a fluke. Naomi Novik taps yet again into the rich, multiethnic folklore of her ancestral lands of the former Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth to spin an incredible, riveting tale that blasts stereotypes and flips traditional... See more
This is the ultimate proof that Uprooted was not a fluke. Naomi Novik taps yet again into the rich, multiethnic folklore of her ancestral lands of the former Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth to spin an incredible, riveting tale that blasts stereotypes and flips traditional gender roles upside-down.

What makes Spinning Silver so intriguing is the way traditional folklore stories, characters and elements are reread and retold from a modern perspective until they are almost unrecognisable. Take the Jewish moneylender who is too kind-hearted to collect his debts. Or the peasant girl who prefers to work for a Jew rather than stay with her abusive, alcoholic father. Or the mousy bride who refuses to be submit to her destiny as a meek wife and instead faces danger head-on to protect what she holds dearest. Rather than sticking to social norm, everyone is given the chance to be whoever they want and make whatever they can out of their lives. Stereotypes are blasted out of the sky with dark glee across the book. There is something immensely liberating in this.

Consequently (and very much unlike traditional folklore), there is no one truly good and no one truly evil in the novel. Everyone is flawed, everyone is somewhat broken, everyone makes mistakes, and everyone seeks to protect what they love and treasure in the only way they know. There is so much humanity in Spinning Silver that it reminds me of a novel by Stefan Zweig.

Gender roles—like everything else—are flipped upside-down. Instead of strong men who save damsels in distress, Spinning Silver has strong women who rescue somewhat colourless and apathetic men. This strong feminist undercurrent has nothing to do with modern-day feminism though. Spinning Silver’s women need to be strong because they have no other choice—having been failed by the men in their lives, they either need to take control or end up being treated worse than cattle.

I have to say that Spinning Silver has been an immensely pleasant surprise. When it came out in 2015, Uprooted was such a success that it managed to sweep—or at least make the shortlists—of every major sci fi and fantasy award across the globe. I did not quite expect the author to be able to repeat this feat any time soon, in particular, with the same folklore theme and a Polish-Lithuanian setting. My surprise is therefore all the more sweeter, as I consider Spinning Silver to be the better and more mature novel of the two, with better characterisation and stronger message. The only question is if Naomi Novik is perhaps setting the bar too high for herself this time?
38 people found this helpful
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Aviva
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
huh?
Reviewed in the United States on December 8, 2018
OK. On board w/Meryam''s take-charge rescue of her family. Working her Jewishness into the story, I liked. On board somewhat less w/the Staryk''s obsession w/gold & her seeming ability to transmogrify silver into gold, by means of, basically, having it smelted & worked into... See more
OK. On board w/Meryam''s take-charge rescue of her family. Working her Jewishness into the story, I liked. On board somewhat less w/the Staryk''s obsession w/gold & her seeming ability to transmogrify silver into gold, by means of, basically, having it smelted & worked into artistic jewelry & selling it. How, then, is she able to turn silver directly into gold once married to the wicked King of the Staryks? All by herself? - still reading, it''s not a great read, but it is kinda fun. Will report more after finishing the book.
...OK, finished the book. Sorry, it really fell to earth with a thud. The plot developed unfollowable side paths, the characters became numerous, &, by the way, not named at the start of their individual narrations, couldn''t know if you were reading the good guy or the villain or what. Or who. It all sort of gathered speed & rolled into a mixed-up ball of plot lines. Shuddered to a standard-issue romance-novel Villain Turns Out To Be A Good Guy Who Does The Right Thing After All ending, but, totally without any romance whatsoever. Nope.
33 people found this helpful
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Rambit
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
PERFECT ending
Reviewed in the United States on January 23, 2019
Novel by Naomi Novik: 5/5 stars Audio narration** by Lisa Flanagan: 6/5 stars My face is a disgusting mess of tears and snot, people. What a PERFECT ending. A robber who steals a knife and cuts himself cannot cry out against the woman who... See more
Novel by Naomi Novik: 5/5 stars

Audio narration** by Lisa Flanagan: 6/5 stars

My face is a disgusting mess of tears and snot, people. What a PERFECT ending.

A robber who steals a knife and cuts himself cannot cry out against the woman who kept it sharp.

I was already so blown away by Novik''s skill to just SPIN WORDS beautifully in Uprooted that to see her meet and then surpass that in Spinning Silver had me in equal parts awe and envy. This author is TALENTED. I would gladly read her grocery lists.

I''m of the opinion that Spinning Silver was better than Uprooted, though I''ve seen plenty of reviews that disagree (which is fine! Opinion is opinion). But I feel like Novik really came into herself with this-- primarily due to the Jewish weavings throughout. There was so much passion and love in this incorporation of Jewish history throughout this loose retelling of Rumplestiltskin. It was seamless and gorgeous with a huge leaning on family and community and being "othered" by anti-semitic townspeople leading to stronger inner bonds.

They talked all the day it seemed to me: talked or sang or even argued. But there was never shouting or raised hands. They were always touching one another. Her mother would put a hand on Miryem’s cheek or her father would kiss her on the head, whenever she passed nearby.

So. What did I LOVE about this? Why is it officially added to my very selective "favorite books ever" list? Simple: This is a book about undervalued/underestimated women saying NO. And me? I am ALL about that.

Of the many POV characters, the three most relevant are Miryem (who I am in love with, oh my GOD. She''s officially added to my "frankly scary mastermind character faves" right along Kaz Brekker and Jude Duarte), a young Jewish businesswoman who takes NO guff. Who loves her family and community and will NOT let herself be stomped upon. When she’s whisked away to be a Staryk (basically an ice fairy) bride against her will because he covets her skill of transforming silver into gold, she will stop at nothing to return home, matching wits with the ultra-powerful king to get away from him at all costs.

“If you’re lucky enough to catch a goose that lays golden eggs,” I bit out, glaring up at the king, “and you’d like them delivered on a regular basis, you’d better see it tended to its satisfaction, if you have any sense: have you?”

Then there’s Wanda, the oldest of three abused children with a brute of a father willing to sell them away for nothing. She works for Miryem’s family and, through them, learns to read and what it means to be a family, and also self worth. I won’t spoil anything, but UGH I have SO MANY Wanda feelings, yo. Her big NO moment comes early on, but it echoes throughout. I am so beyond proud of this girl, y’all. (Also, I can’t be the only person who came away from this book a raging Wanda/Miryem shipper, can I?)

There are men who are wolves inside, and want to eat up other people to fill their bellies. That is what was in your house with you, all your life. But here you are with your brothers, and you are not eaten up, and there is not a wolf inside you. You have fed each other, and you kept the wolf away. That is all we can do for each other in the world, to keep the wolf away.

Finally, easily overlooked at first (though I think that’s DEFINITELY intentional, cuz. That’s sort of her Thing) is Irena, the very plain daughter of a duke with enough Staryk blood in her ancestry that, through a series of events, she ends up married against her will to a demon-possessed tsar that terrorized her as a child. Her NO moment is quieter, sneakier, but continues throughout. She is so brilliant in how she navigates basic SURVIVAL with this monster of a husband and slowly turns every situation to her advantage. As a Slytherin myself, I can definitely appreciate this Slytherin character-- and she plainly shows how there’s not always a right answer. That ambition CAN actually be altruistic, and… LORD I can’t get into too much without spoiling. (SOMEONE PLEASE TALK TO ME ABOUT IRENA I HAVE SO MANY THOUGHTS.)

“So the fairy silver brought you a monster of fire for a husband, and me a monster of ice. We should put them in a room together and let them make us both widows.”

There are many other characters, too-- perhaps ONE thing to this book''s detriment is not how MANY characters there are telling the story, but how it''s never labelled. It would help clear up confusion if the character doing the narration’s name was written above the page breaks)-- but the two that stood out most to me were Stepon, Wanda''s little brother (I would have thought it''d be annoying to have a little kid telling part of the story, but he was used sparingly and effectively, giving a child''s simpler perspective to some of the more horrific or otherwise overwhelming scenes) and Mirnatius, Irena''s demon-possessed husband.

Listen. I kind of have a thing for certain kinds of jerkwad characters. I don''t know how Novik managed to inject humor into forced marriage and attempted uxoricide, but she did it, damn it-- I laughed a lot at his graveyard humor. And when he wasn’t being snarky and sarcastic as a coping mechanism for his horrible situation, he was brooding or scheming or scary or, very occasionally, sympathetic. I enjoyed every moment he was on the page.

There’s so much more to say, but this review is already far too long. I’ll end on this: I could never predict what was going to happen next, yet somehow when it did happen, it fell perfectly into place. This was just a beautifully woven fairy tale from beginning to end, and I am completely satisfied.

** I bought the kindle book and also purchased audible narration. So while I did read chunks of this as a “normal” book, I listened to more than half of it as an audio.
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Honora McDonald
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Weaving Delights
Reviewed in the United States on August 22, 2018
I''ve always enjoyed Naomi Novik''s writing, though I did think she got bored with the Temeraire series by the last few books. So it was with great interest that I saw she had gotten into reworked fairytales. "Uprooted", the first book, was charming. But with... See more
I''ve always enjoyed Naomi Novik''s writing, though I did think she got bored with the Temeraire series by the last few books. So it was with great interest that I saw she had gotten into reworked fairytales. "Uprooted", the first book, was charming. But with "Spinning Silver" she hits it out of the park and past the parking lot.

It''s an astonishing amalgam of several fairy stories, "Rumpelstiltskin" being the foundation, but what is most delightful is that it''s Eastern European, which we don''t get much in high fantasy. Even better, it''s Jewish, which we get even less. There are three co-protagonists, all of them strong, smart young women who are set against three monstrous males, and three main story threads, though a couple of other viewpoints are tossed in from time to time.

I found it difficult at first to figure whose story was being told, but you come to learn the voices pretty quickly. The main one is Miryem, short, brown-haired, observantly Jewish (how often do you read about a character in fairyland fretting about the Shabbat?), not classically pretty, but with a fantastically clever mind and an amazing magical gift, and she was by far my favorite. Wanda, the servant girl contending with a violently abusive father, was my next favorite, and Irina, dealing with a demon-inhabited tsar husband, I actively disliked.
But the Staryk king, the ostensibly evil winter monarch who takes Miryem to his icy fortress to avail himself of her gold-changing gift, is a truly amazing creation: a faerie lord who is cranky, easily irritated, painfully honest and hiding several secrets. In fact, the whole Staryk people, who live in perpetual winter, are marvelous, and a nice change from the usual faerie types.
It didn''t occur to me until the third read that there is an even deeper subtext, switching between plot threads, of the Holocaust. The anti-Semitism of the bigoted peasant villagers is right up front, but when the story gets into the Staryk people being steered toward annihilation by a fire demon who then plans to turn on the rest of the population it all becomes truly chilling, and thankfully Novik doesn''t get preachy about it.

The only real problem I have with the book is one I''ve often encountered before in Novik''s Temeraire series, which is that she gets so caught up in her own creation that she forgets to fully explain it to the reader. I had to reread "Spinning Silver" three times to figure out why the king, the Rumpelstiltskin figure, is stealing all the gold and then grabbing Miryem to make sure he has an inexhaustible supply; I still am unsure. Maybe that''s my failing, but I am a careful and very attentive reader, so I think the fault is more the author''s than mine. The reader needs to do some work, it''s true, but to my mind Novik is careless in this respect, so eager to get to the payoff that she neglects to let the reader know what''s the cause and result.
Plus Miryem seems to cheat the king by not fulfilling the task he sets her, though it turns out okay in the end, and again I had to reread passages to figure it out.

But Novik is simultaneously a gloriously lyrical and down-to-earth writer, and ultimately she pulls it off. And the end is splendidly satisfying, all one could wish from a true fairytale.

Highly recommended; I knocked off one star for the above issues.
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Matthew Green
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another great book from one of my favorite contemporary authors
Reviewed in the United States on July 21, 2018
Like key characters in this book (and in her previous novel of the same genre, Uprooted), Novik has the gift of working magic, weaving words into a literary incantation that holds me spellbound. The characters and scenes from Spinning Silver resonate in my imagination,... See more
Like key characters in this book (and in her previous novel of the same genre, Uprooted), Novik has the gift of working magic, weaving words into a literary incantation that holds me spellbound. The characters and scenes from Spinning Silver resonate in my imagination, striking chords that continue to reverberate long after I''m done reading the book.
Aside from the fantasy elements as such, which are captivating, there are other elements worthy of mention. As a man, one thing I enjoy is the way she writes this book mostly from the perspective of strong women, without being unsympathetic to the male characters. It helps me see things from a different perspective. I also enjoy the integration of elements of Jewish faith and culture, which I haven''t encountered very often in fantasy works (perhaps due to not reading the right books).
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sjhigbee
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Retelling with a complex plot
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 12, 2018
I’ve heard this one described as a retelling of the old fairytale ‘Rumplestiltskin’, but it isn’t that straightforward. Novik has taken elements of that story – just a few – and woven them into another, more detailed backdrop. The setting is a version of 19th century...See more
I’ve heard this one described as a retelling of the old fairytale ‘Rumplestiltskin’, but it isn’t that straightforward. Novik has taken elements of that story – just a few – and woven them into another, more detailed backdrop. The setting is a version of 19th century Russia, complete with isolated villages surrounded by hundreds of miles of thick woodland, nobility who have the power of life and death over their subjects and a simmering resentment against the Jewish community. They are the ones who lend money to those who need it, the ones who often also make music, jewellery and can read and write within their close-knit communities, so make a convenient target when those in power don’t want to pay back their debts. Add in the danger of the ferocious cold of a Russian winter, when the dreaded Staryk are more easily able to cross into the human world. These icy fae have mercilessly predated upon the humans who wander too far into their forests, killing and stealing from them – and when their actions further impact upon the protagonists in the story, these shadowy, terrifying beings end up at the heart of this story. It’s a complicated tale with three main protagonists, Miryem, the moneylender’s daughter, Wanda, who becomes her servant and is desperate to escape her drunken abusive father and Irena, the Duke’s eldest daughter by his first wife, whose bookish nature and plain looks have been a constant disappointment – until the Tsar comes to visit… The story bounces between these three young women as their fates increasingly become intertwined. There is a fair amount of explanation – with pages when Novik is telling the story rather than having her characters speak, which I normally dislike. But I’m going to give her a pass on this one – firstly because it didn’t jar with me. This is, after all, a fairy story, which is always told from the outside in. Secondly, because though there is a fair amount of exposition, it was necessary in this complex plot and it didn’t stop Novik from immersing us in the thoughts and fears of her main protagonists. Thirdly, it was a delightfully long book with an unusually dense story, which I loved. I’m aware this is a Marmite book – those aspects I’ve listed above as pluses have also exasperated some readers, preventing them from bonding with this book. Normally, I love a story to unfold from the inside out, but I simply think this time around it wouldn’t have worked so effectively. All I would say is – give it a go and discover for yourself if this one is for you. If you enjoy it, you’ll thank me. This is one that has had me continuing to ponder it since I’ve read it – always a sign that a book has properly got under my skin and it’s recommended for fantasy fans who like detailed worlds with plenty of unexpected twists.
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B. Douglas
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A beautiful, magical tale, and a thought-provoking meditation on paying what is owed.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 16, 2018
Spinning Silver is a beautiful, magical tale, full of richly drawn, flawed and limited characters doing their very best in desperate situations and achieving more than they could have imagined. The events of the story may have been inspired by the story of Rumplestiltskin,...See more
Spinning Silver is a beautiful, magical tale, full of richly drawn, flawed and limited characters doing their very best in desperate situations and achieving more than they could have imagined. The events of the story may have been inspired by the story of Rumplestiltskin, but though names are important, and stuff is turned to gold, and kings and queens and children feature heavily, knowing the tale gives very few clues to how the plot will go. Delightfully, all the strongest, cleverest characters, good and bad alike, are female; which is not to say the males are incidental or even weak, just that the females are spectacular. On another level, this story is an engaging mediation on the nature of indebtedness, and gifts; of honour and honesty. Love wins in the end, but it is long in making its appearance. Until then the tale is ruled by cold justice and fair return, or hot injustice. As always, Novik''s writing is fluent, engaging, and often poetic. It conveys the flavour of it''s setting in its very cadences. I highly recommend this!
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Caroline Sundberg
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A superbly written, enthralling piece of fantasy.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 25, 2018
Never one to turn down a good fairy tale/folktale inspired piece of work, the great acclaim that Spinning Silver seemed to be getting completely piqued my interest. Initially I was a bit concerned that the plot would be slow going, especially given the size of the book, but...See more
Never one to turn down a good fairy tale/folktale inspired piece of work, the great acclaim that Spinning Silver seemed to be getting completely piqued my interest. Initially I was a bit concerned that the plot would be slow going, especially given the size of the book, but within a few chapters I found myself absolutely hooked. The sort of hooked that sees you staying up far too late, and putting off all the various things that need to be done, just to keep reading it that little bit longer. Novick did a superb job in wrapping it up, with the right amount of closure as a standalone novel, but also the right amount of mystery about the future - just enough to keep the reader guessing but not completely uncertain. I really didn''t want it to end, quite frankly, and I feel like I could just go on and on reading about this world and its characters. Each character is beautifully fleshed out, with flaws and redeeming factors in equal measure. Nobody was too perfect, or too evil, and as such the world and its plot seemed absolutely plausible - despite being set in a world with magic and other goings on. I wholeheartedly recommend this book for those who love an enthralling story, set in a world that both resembles and does not resemble our own, that is well written with just the right amount of mystery throughout.
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ClareR
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Take my money! If Novik’s name is on it, I’ll read it!!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 13, 2018
Advertised as a retelling of Rumpelstiltskin, this takes quite some imagination to get the reader to that particular fairy tale. I’m assuming that the Staryk King is along the lines of the Rumpelstiltskin character, except he isn’t some wizened dwarf. In fact, more than one...See more
Advertised as a retelling of Rumpelstiltskin, this takes quite some imagination to get the reader to that particular fairy tale. I’m assuming that the Staryk King is along the lines of the Rumpelstiltskin character, except he isn’t some wizened dwarf. In fact, more than one of the characters carries some of Rumpelstiltskin’s traits. Miryem, the Jewish Moneylenders daughter (who is actually far better at it than her father), has a reputation for turning silver in to gold, and this reaches the ears of the Staryk King, who demands that she change his silver in to gold. Which she does three times; the consequences of which aren’t quite what she expects. Novik writes good female characters, without any doubt. Miryem, whotakes over her father’s moneylending business and saves her family; Irena, the daughter of a Duke, who marries the demon possessed Tsar; and Wanda, the daughter of a destitute, drunk farmer, who by luck comes to pay off her father’s debts by working for Miryem. These women’s lives converge to create a bewitching story of real human concerns: poverty, helplessness, strength found when needed, and how important it is to pay your debts! I do hope Novik writes more books like this. I’ll buy them all!!
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Chrikaru
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Enthralling, atmospheric and with plenty of girlpower!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 12, 2019
The real story isn’t half as pretty as the one you’ve heard. The real story is, the miller’s daughter with her long golden hair wants to catch a lord, a prince, a rich man’s son, so she goes to the moneylender and borrows for a ring and a necklace and decks herself out for...See more
The real story isn’t half as pretty as the one you’ve heard. The real story is, the miller’s daughter with her long golden hair wants to catch a lord, a prince, a rich man’s son, so she goes to the moneylender and borrows for a ring and a necklace and decks herself out for the festival. And she’s beautiful enough, so the lord, the prince, the rich man’s son notices her, and dances with her, and tumbles her in a quiet hayloft when the dancing is over, and afterwards he goes home and marries the rich woman his family has picked out for him. Then the miller’s despoiled daughter tells everyone that the moneylender’s in league with the devil, and the village runs him out or maybe even stones him, so at least she gets to keep the jewels for a dowry, and the blacksmith marries her before that firstborn child comes along a little early. Because that’s what the story’s really about: getting out of paying your debts. That’s not how they tell it, but I knew. My father was a moneylender, you see. He wasn’t very good at it. First impressions: I wanted to read this straightaway because I loved Uprooted. I am a massive fan of reimagined or ‘fractured’ fairytales so I have been very fond of the fashion for retellings over the last few years. I liked how Uprooted drew on folklore and fairytales. Recently, I have also been reading some Russian fairytales and some books based around them (The Bear and the Nightingale, The House with Chicken Legs etc) so I was excited to see that Spinning Silver drew on these, as well as the fact that it sounded like it was using Rumplestiltskin, not one of the more commonly recycled fairytales. Also, look at the beautiful cover! I still regret not getting a hardback of Uprooted as I was out of the country when it came out so I have just bought a copy of Spinning Silver in hardback to make sure I don’t miss out on it too! I loved following Miryem on her journey, from being the granddaughter of a very good moneylender and the daughter of a very poor one, to taking matters into her own hands and turning difficulty into prosperity. The introduction of the Staryk raised the stakes even further, with a careless boast leading to all sorts of problems for her. Just like in the old fairytales, which are often darker than the Disney-ified version that is most popular, the supernatural forces that she tangles with are capricious and could be deadly. We are then introduced to Wanda, an ordinary girl who suffers at the hands of a drunken father and wants to protect her brothers. When she catches wind of her father selling her off as a bride, she takes her fate into her won hands and it becomes entangled with Miryem’s. Finally we meet the third of our female protagonists, Irina, the rather-plan daughter of a lord who is able to catch the eye of the tsar himself thanks to the power of enchanted silver jewellery. Yet, the tsar is home to something far more powerful and malevolent than she could ever have imagined… The threads of the narrative wind tighter and tighter, finally bringing these three women together in a scenario where each of their strength and determination helps them to decide their own path. These are powerful women, without wielding a weapon, flawed, real and gripping. I loved all the little snippets of folklore and fairytales in each of the three narratives, the little nods towards a shared narrative history, yet with elements from history and a distinctly modern outlook. If you liked Uprooted, you will love this. And, if you haven’t read either yet, what are you waiting for? Spinning Silver will enthrall you from the first sentence, drawing you tighter into the story with every twist. Even if you’re reading it on a hot summer day, be prepared to feel the shiver of an icy wind… Enthralling, atmospheric and with plenty of girlpower, this is a re-imagined fairytale like no other! My mother’s face was full of misery. We didn’t speak. Would you rather we were sill poor and hungry?” I burst out to her finally, the silence between us heavy in the midst of the dark woods, and she put her arms around me and kissed me and said, “My darling, my darling, I’m sorry,” weeping a little. “Sorry?” I said. “To be warm instead of cold? To be rich and comfortable? To have a daughter who can turn silver into gold?” I pushed away from her. “To see you harden yourself to ice, to make it so,” she said. The horses trotted on more swiftly, but the Staryk road kept pace with us all the way home, shining between the trees. I could feel it on my side, a shimmer of colder wind trying to press against me and pierce through to my skin, but I didn’t care. I was colder inside than out. What I liked: I liked how the story was based on Russian folklore, the way several stories are melded together, the real-life aspects of anti-semitism which added an extra depth, the character development, particularly as the ‘baddies’ generally turn out to be more nuanced. I loved the central figures of each story being female, as well as the fact that they all changed their destinies through brains and hard work – you don’t have to have a sword to be kick-ass! Even better if: Can I have Naomi Novik’s next book already? How you could use it in your classroom: This would be a great book for older secondary pupils or at college/ university when looking at comparative literature and how all of the original threads from folklore, fairytale and history have been woven together to create a multi-faceted, rich story. I would also love to look at how he familiarity of fairytales affects our experience with this story e.g. the tree who contains the spirit of Wanda’s mother and the nut (like Cinderella) and the ‘witch’s house’ where certain tasks must be completed in return for hospitality, etc.
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