Option lowest 2021 B outlet sale

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Option lowest 2021 B outlet sale
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Gently used may contain ex-library markings, possibly has some light highlighting, textual notations, and or underlining. Text is still easily readable.
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Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy (191 POCHE)
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Posttraumatic Growth

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Lucille M. Zimmerman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Important topic that most people don''t know about.
Reviewed in the United States on April 25, 2017
I''m not finished but I wanted to chime in right away. I''m a Licensed Professional Counselor, part-time teacher at Colorado Christian University, and published author. I live in the Columbine neighborhood and worked with police and firefighters at Ground Zero so healing from... See more
I''m not finished but I wanted to chime in right away. I''m a Licensed Professional Counselor, part-time teacher at Colorado Christian University, and published author. I live in the Columbine neighborhood and worked with police and firefighters at Ground Zero so healing from trauma is of huge interest to me.

I''ve spent the last four years researching and writing about the powerful topic of Posttraumatic Growth. (I wish I could tell you the title of my book but it remains in the hands of agents and publishers. I hope it gets to be born someday.)

In the meantime I want to shout hurray and yeehaw on almost every single page of this book.

The smashing point of this book: All people can heal, and some people are even launched to a more meaningful place after experiencing trauma; clinical research shows how.

Growth is actually more common than the much better known and far better studied posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The challenge is to see the opportunity presented by seismic events. After trauma, people need hope. In the aftermath of the tragedy, people need to know there is something better.

Following a traumatic experience, most people experience a range of problems: Trouble sleeping, nightmares, agitation, flashbacks, emotional numbness, avoiding reminders of the traumatic event, anxiety, anger, guilt, hyper-vigilance, depression, isolation, suicidal tendencies, etc. Until recently the entire discussion of the human response to trauma ended with a summation of the hardships incurred by trauma. But as it turns out, a traumatic event is not simply a hardship to be overcome.

Instead, it is transformative.

Trauma survivors and their family and friends need to know there is another side to trauma. Strange as it may sound, half of all sufferers emerge from the trauma stronger, more focused, and with a new perspective on their future. In numerous studies, about half of all trauma survivors report positive changes as a result of their experience. Sometimes the changes are small (life has more meaning, or the survivor feels closer to loved ones) and other times they are massive, sending people on new career paths. The worst things that happen to us might put us on a path to the best things that will ever happen to us. A brush with trauma often pushes trauma survivors to face their own mortality and to find a more meaningful and fulfilling understanding of who they are and how they want to live.

To be clear, growth does not undo loss, and it does not eliminate adversity. Posttraumatic growth is not the same as an increase in well-being or a decrease in distress. And even for those who do experience growth, suffering is not mitigated in the aftermath of tragedy. Growth may make the pain meaningful and bearable, but it does not deny the hurt.

For decades, nearly all the psychological research into trauma and recovery has focused on the debilitating problems that people face, but Option B speaks of the paths people can take to heal from their experiences and discover new meaning in their lives.

Just this morning a blog reader wrote to me and said she feels stuck because of her father''s suicide many years ago. The first thing I did was tell her about your book.

I have been, and will be, recommending this book to friends and clients.

Thank you Sheryl and Adam.
979 people found this helpful
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Candyce Ossefort-Russell, LPC-S
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Business professor provides ill-advised, harmful strategies for sidestepping grief
Reviewed in the United States on June 19, 2017
At the beginning of this book, I felt grateful to Sandberg and Grant for their clear articulation of how we as a culture fail those who are suffering by not talking to them about their adversity. Early chapters provide some ideas about how to bring up difficult situations... See more
At the beginning of this book, I felt grateful to Sandberg and Grant for their clear articulation of how we as a culture fail those who are suffering by not talking to them about their adversity. Early chapters provide some ideas about how to bring up difficult situations and how to offer concrete, realistic help instead of fuzzy, generalized help. Later chapters on raising resilient kids and failing at work provide some good recommendations for building resilience, but it’s unclear to me what that kind of resilience has to do with helping people bear the intense emotions of grief and trauma.

The rest of the book was shockingly awful. Sandberg and Grant pushed way beyond basic recommendations for supporting grieving people into promoting their strategies for “overcoming” adversity as universally helpful. Their resilience strategies are so ill-advised for normal grieving and traumatized people that I can not only not recommend this book, I also need to strongly speak out against it.

As a person who was suddenly widowed 25 years ago, when my son was an infant; and as a psychotherapist who has helped people with grief and trauma for over 20 years, I’m horrified and insulted by the way Grant misapplies to grief and trauma his business-based positive-psychology strategies—strategies that are intended to help people with performance anxiety, not mortal suffering.

I know from experience that untimely loss is brutal, and I don’t fault Sandberg for submitting to Grant’s insistence that she follow his prescriptive exercises, especially because he frightens her by telling her that if she continues to feel her painful feelings, she’ll be “trapped” in negative emotion and her children “won’t recover.” Of course she wants her kids to be okay. So she uses his change-your-thinking exercises to momentarily stanch her wrenching pain. But in the long run, these strategies don’t get rid of grief’s intense feelings. Instead, Grant’s strategies sidestep anguishing emotions and push them underground where they fester and cause problems—years later and in future generations.

I think it was irresponsible of the publisher to allow two unqualified people to make these damaging universal suggestions to grieving and traumatized people. Sandberg is a brand-new widow. (Whether she and the general public want to believe it or not, two years into widowhood is very early.) Though I would have supported her writing a memoir of her early widowhood; I think it’s naïve for her to advise anyone on how to deal with grief and trauma for the long haul.

And Grant is a BUSINESS professor. He has zero training for working with people who are going through intensely emotional experiences, and no knowledge of up-to-date emotion science. The strategies he foists onto Sandberg emerged from research on learning and performance, not on dealing with overwhelming emotion. His cognitive-behavioral tools coerce Sandberg out of her pain and force her to prematurely and frantically chase after joy, gratitude, and meaning. These healing emotions don’t need to be hastily imposed onto people. Joy, gratitude, and meaning naturally arise when grieving people are given time and help to bear their intense emotions.

Though Sandberg was able to harness her strong achievement-drive to employ Grant’s tools for dominating her grief and leaping toward joy, all of the tools spring from a hijacking of a narrow theory about the single personality trait of resilience for willfully overpowering anguish. Throughout the book, Sandberg and Grant use terms like overcome adversity, triumph over sadness, and regain control. These warlike terms reveal that they view grief as a monster that we should fear and flee from, or battle and fight against, and to ultimately prevail over. Though ultimately fear-based, this ego-driven, conflict-filled story preserves the beloved American illusion that even in the face of horrific tragedy, we can acquire weapons of resilience in order to dominate the grief monster and bounce back to normal in just over a year.

When distressing grief reactions occur in a society like ours that denigrates long-lasting and intense grief responses, grievers can end up isolated, ashamed, and ill. They believe, “Something’s wrong with me. I need to make this stop.” “If I were resilient, I wouldn’t be so overwhelmed.” These beliefs are invalidating and they perpetuate a harmful fear of grief, and Option B throws gasoline on the flames of these beliefs.

Emotion science clearly shows that when we are plunged into intense emotional states such as grief, we need to feel understood and we need to be helped to express our emotions in a way that doesn’t overwhelm us. Grant never soothes Sandberg, never offers her kindness to help her bear and express her grief. Instead, he responds to her sadness, despair, or guilt with stern warnings that she’s “delaying her recovery” and “delaying her kids’ recovery.” His strident approach leaves me feeling fiercely protective of all grieving people, including Sandberg. I’ve already seen clients having normal grief responses who feel ashamed and afraid of their own emotions when they compare themselves to Sandberg.

I dislike the way resilience—as sold by Option B—is making grievers feel bad. I’m angry that Option B is turning resilience into a new hurtful grief myth that grievers have to fight against in order to heal, a myth that makes grievers feel ashamed and frightened if they can’t bounce back immediately, and if they don’t feel like prematurely striving toward joy when they’re honorably slogging through toward real healing.
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graham robinson
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Avoid Option B if you have lost someone recently.
Reviewed in the United States on September 13, 2017
Sandberg''s genius and tragedy bleed through the pages of Option B. She brings insight, compassion, organizational brilliance, and wisdom from amazing friends into an important conversation. In her interviews, she makes it clear that stregthening resilience from huge loss... See more
Sandberg''s genius and tragedy bleed through the pages of Option B. She brings insight, compassion, organizational brilliance, and wisdom from amazing friends into an important conversation. In her interviews, she makes it clear that stregthening resilience from huge loss is possible for those who have experienced loss. AND increased resilience is even possible for those who have not yet experienced loss. And this is where the book goes off the rails. Sandberg''s desire to make this book universally helpful, tilted it''s narrative to be problematic for many who have recently lost a loved one. I bought eight copies of Option B for a "Grief Care and Support Group." Those who suffered loss over four years ago thoroughly enjoying the wisdom of Option B. It resonated with what they learned from the loss of children and spouses. Those who suffered loss within a year did not return to discuss the book again. Two who did not return, said Option B was not helpful and they would stay away from the group until we finished the book. I think it was hard for two women who had lost spouses in their 60s an 80s to hear about someone who was surrounded by amazingly caring people including a mom who would help her cry to sleep at night and a brother who called every day for six months. Sandberg confesses that she has a unique amount of resources that most people do not enjoy. But she was referring to economic resources. The resources that were most valuable were (and are) the incredible human web of family and friends. For some who have lost a spouse later in life, some of Sandberg''s stories unintentionally reminded them of how incredibly alone they are. I think trying to meet the needs of everyone (those grieving AND those yet to grieve), occasionally distorted this book of wisdom into a book of pain for those who need it the most. And I believe that for many people who have just lost someone, Option B is an option they should avoid.
142 people found this helpful
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Julie
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Really didn''t like it
Reviewed in the United States on October 7, 2017
I''m sorry, but I really disliked this book. I really liked her previous book, but this one not so much. A rich and famous person with a huge support network telling ordinary people, some of who are not only struggling emotionally but also financially, how to get over it... See more
I''m sorry, but I really disliked this book. I really liked her previous book, but this one not so much. A rich and famous person with a huge support network telling ordinary people, some of who are not only struggling emotionally but also financially, how to get over it and become a better person! Resilience is bs in my opinion. You either have supportive people around you or you don''t. If you do, you''re able to resilient and if you don''t, good luck. It''s not something you can get from a book.
58 people found this helpful
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James Atkinson
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
How to survive adversity and go back to enjoying life as a billionaire.
Reviewed in the United States on June 26, 2018
This is a fatuous book written from the perspective of a person whose privileges are so great in this life, losing her husband is an emotional inconvenience. Had she not held such a societal position in the first place, it would likely never have been published, and... See more
This is a fatuous book written from the perspective of a person whose privileges are so great in this life, losing her husband is an emotional inconvenience. Had she not held such a societal position in the first place, it would likely never have been published, and certainly would not have been read by more than a dozen people.
20 people found this helpful
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HalleysComet
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s Not About Resilience -- It''s About How Sheryl Sandberg Processed Her Grief.
Reviewed in the United States on May 27, 2017
I really wanted to like this book, but here''s how it disappointed me: - It''s not about resilience, it''s about how Sheryl Sandberg process her grief. - As a result, it''s a sad -- very sad book -- a downer -- but not particularly helpful. - I wanted to learn... See more
I really wanted to like this book, but here''s how it disappointed me:
- It''s not about resilience, it''s about how Sheryl Sandberg process her grief.
- As a result, it''s a sad -- very sad book -- a downer -- but not particularly helpful.
- I wanted to learn more about resilience. The book would have been more universal if more of Adam Grant''s research had been cited, discussed, etc. Instead, it felt like a cheap literary device to make Sheryl seem more credible.
- She still speaks from a woman of privilege -- She must have mentioned at least 5x that her mother slept next to her in her bed each night for a month. Then her sister in law took over. Very few of us would have a mother who could do that. Maybe I''m jealous. My mom''s dead. But even still, not sure my mom would have done this for me even thought I know she loved me.
- When I read that after 4 months, Sheryl was getting excited about flirty emails from guys, it made me feel that she was not so much a loving, despondent widow, but a needy one.
Why then did I give it 2 stars instead of 1? Because I like her. She has a very authentic voice, her Facebook posts were admirable, she''s made Facebook a kinder, more gentler place, and most of all, I can''t imagine losing my husband. I feel for her.
66 people found this helpful
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Rachael
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Went in too many directions
Reviewed in the United States on July 7, 2017
I bought this book after hearing from a friend of a friend how helpful it could be for me. I wasn''t able to get beyond the first 34 pages without several references to politics and opinions on social injustices. I just wanted to read how a woman who lost her husband dealt... See more
I bought this book after hearing from a friend of a friend how helpful it could be for me. I wasn''t able to get beyond the first 34 pages without several references to politics and opinions on social injustices. I just wanted to read how a woman who lost her husband dealt with loss. The very little I read was all over the board, not focused in the least. Not sure who this book is aimed at helping.
57 people found this helpful
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Richa Soni
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
“Death ends a life but it does not end a relationship”
Reviewed in the United States on January 2, 2018
“Death ends a life but it does not end a relationship” Once in a while there comes a book which kind of shakes you up. This is what this book has done to me. This is a brave confession by Sheryl Sandberg on how her & her kids life changed when she unexpectedly... See more
“Death ends a life but it does not end a relationship”

Once in a while there comes a book which kind of shakes you up. This is what this book has done to me. This is a brave confession by Sheryl Sandberg on how her & her kids life changed when she unexpectedly lost her husband while on a vacation & how she has learned to cope with that grief .... I cannot stop myself from using the adjective “brave” for Sheryl, considering how she has laid herself out there in this book so that others in similar situation can learn from her & yet others can learn to appreciate the people who are still in their lives, who we end up taking for granted .... there is one very beautiful line that Sheryl has written in this book which will stay with me forever, she says, “Death ends a life but it does not end a relationship” .... for the sake of her two wonderful kids & her own self, Sheryl has learned to cope with her grief .... #OptionB
7 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

MCP
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s easy to grief and build resilience...when you are in the Ivory Tower
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 19, 2018
As other customers already wrote, the book is really irritating. I bought it in order to have some self-help on how to cope with grief and resilience, but I am really disappointed. To begin with, the author speaks from a privileged position. I knew this already, but I had...See more
As other customers already wrote, the book is really irritating. I bought it in order to have some self-help on how to cope with grief and resilience, but I am really disappointed. To begin with, the author speaks from a privileged position. I knew this already, but I had no idea how clear this is spat into the reader''s face since the beginning. In order: two kids, two brothers, a mother, a father, family friends, the best support ever in terms of specialists, "Mark and Priscilla", extreme and privileged financial security, the best advice from the best grief specialists of the country. I mean, really? I do understand that sorrow and grief is always subjective, but the book should have better spoken to the "average" person, namely a person who has no SUCH a BIG support network, a person who experiences financial problems and job unsecurities, a person who struggle every morning to wake up because , differently from her, it has no one helping to wake up. Even though the author reminds here and there that she is, indeed, privileged, it really does nothing to sympathize with the reader. There are some other examples in the book which are surely far mor real than her examples, but they are the exception. The norm, in this book, is this privileged golden cage of grief in which she is and from which it makes 10 million times easier compared to the normal people to find resilience. Ina even more irritating way, she reminds here and there again, that in the world there are poor people, people who suffer, people who experience inequality and unfairness from life...after few lines, all this is again forgotten, to give room, once again, to the best specialists ever, the best friends ever (how lucky is she?), the best boss ever (again, so lucky) who helped in coping. I do honestly not reccommend it if you buy it to find a way to cope with your grief and become more resilient. For instance, I had bought years ago, another book called "The obstacle is the way", and, even though this book shows several examples from famous people and how they coped with adversity, I really found it illuminating. And the reason is that I could mirror and sympathize with many of the stories. This book, on the contrary, is completely out of reality, at least the reality of many of us.
31 people found this helpful
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GES
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 14, 2018
Recommended by a friend who works in psychiatry. Really nicely written, not wordy or exclusively for academics, but rather focuses on human connection and it''s necessity to (as the title suggests) face adversity, build resilience and find joy. Finds a nice balance between...See more
Recommended by a friend who works in psychiatry. Really nicely written, not wordy or exclusively for academics, but rather focuses on human connection and it''s necessity to (as the title suggests) face adversity, build resilience and find joy. Finds a nice balance between being ''too American'' and the universal reader, even though some topics and studies focus mainly on American findings. Found myself applying simple suggestions addressed within the book, and they are effective (simply saying "is there something I can do to help?" rather than "is there anything I can do to help?"). A lot of content I felt I already knew, but this really made me mindful to this knowledge and helped address how to use it better in real life scenarios. I really enjoyed reading it (despite having not read Sandbergs ''Lean In'') and would recommend it to others.
4 people found this helpful
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Vanaja Shankar
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A book that you should not miss
Reviewed in India on May 7, 2017
I was initially hesitant about buying this book - my fear was that it would be too depressing to read about death and personal setbacks and yet the title prmoised hope. What I liked about the book is that Sheryl has shared her story of loss and resilience in a truly...See more
I was initially hesitant about buying this book - my fear was that it would be too depressing to read about death and personal setbacks and yet the title prmoised hope. What I liked about the book is that Sheryl has shared her story of loss and resilience in a truly authentic manner. It requires great courage to be so open about personal emotions and fears. What comes through is her compassion for others, sharing her journey of resilience ro reach out to others, give hope. But this book is not just about emotions. There is a lot of learning backed by research and knowledge. Though the book is wriiten in Sheryl''s voice, I am able to see & understand the wisdom and thought process of Prof. Adam Grant that forms the lifeline. I recommend this book to everyone (not just those who are battling with a personal loss) for three valuable lessons I learnt :1) Resilience is a muscle that needs to be built not during a crisis but during normal low stress times. 2) we need to learn how to be compassionate, communicate with people who are under extreme stress, how to support them the way the want. 3) we need to learn to enjoy each moment, appreciate the small and big things that we are blessed with in life, and be thankful for God''s grace.
41 people found this helpful
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Sam
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Recommended to me after my father died
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 10, 2017
My dad died at least ten years to soon a few weeks ago and a friend tentatively recommended this book as a way to think differently about grief. Basically it’s fantastic. Read it. There are probably bits you’ll skip but the beginning and end chapters would help with your...See more
My dad died at least ten years to soon a few weeks ago and a friend tentatively recommended this book as a way to think differently about grief. Basically it’s fantastic. Read it. There are probably bits you’ll skip but the beginning and end chapters would help with your approach to many different types of trauma and loss.
6 people found this helpful
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Jules
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Despite the death of her husband being the heart-rending stimulus ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 4, 2018
Despite the death of her husband being the heart-rending stimulus for this book, it is a strangely uplifting work, with attitudes and ideas on resilience which are equally applicable to individuals and corporations alike. Both her frank, open and crushingly honest views,...See more
Despite the death of her husband being the heart-rending stimulus for this book, it is a strangely uplifting work, with attitudes and ideas on resilience which are equally applicable to individuals and corporations alike. Both her frank, open and crushingly honest views, and her approach to recovering stability and a sense of normality are something from which everyone can take heart – and not just because it is a sensibly titled work on the subject. An inspirational, emotional and hugely positive read.
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