My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

Description

Product Description

NOMINATED FOR THE 2019 BOOKER PRIZE 
WINNER OF THE LA TIMES BOOK PRIZE FOR MYSTERY/THRILLER
FINALIST FOR THE 2019 WOMEN''S PRIZE



Korede’s sister Ayoola is many things: the favorite child, the beautiful one, possibly sociopathic. And now Ayoola’s third boyfriend in a row is dead, stabbed through the heart with Ayoola’s knife. Korede’s practicality is the sisters’ saving grace. She knows the best solutions for cleaning blood (bleach, bleach, and more bleach), the best way to move a body (wrap it in sheets like a mummy), and she keeps Ayoola from posting pictures to Instagram when she should be mourning her “missing” boyfriend. Not that she gets any credit.

Korede has long been in love with a kind, handsome doctor at the hospital where she works. She dreams of the day when he will realize that she’s exactly what he needs. But when he asks Korede for Ayoola’s phone number, she must reckon with what her sister has become and how far she’s willing to go to protect her.

Review


"A taut, rapidly paced thriller that pleasurably subverts serial killer and sisterhood tropes for a guaranteed fun afternoon."  —HUFFINGTON POST

“It’s Lagos noir—pulpy, peppery and sinister, served up in a comic deadpan…This book is, above all, built to move, to hurtle forward—and it does so, dizzyingly. There’s a seditious pleasure in its momentum. At a time when there are such wholesome and dull claims on fiction—on its duty to ennoble or train us in empathy—there’s a relief in encountering a novel faithful to art’s first imperative: to catch and keep our attention… This scorpion-tailed little thriller leaves a response, and a sting, you will remember.”  NEW YORK TIMES

“Campy and delightfully naughty…A taut and darkly funny contemporary noir that moves at lightning speed, it’s the wittiest and most fun murder party you’ve ever been invited to.”  SAM IRBY,  MARIE CLAIRE
 
“Braithwaite’s writing pulses with the fast, slick heartbeat of a YA thriller, cut through by a dry noir wit. That aridity is startling, a trait we might expect from someone older, more jaded—a Cusk, an Offill. But Braithwaite finds in young womanhood a reason to be bitter. At the center of these women’s lives is a knot of pain, and when it springs apart, it bloodies the world.”  —NEW REPUBLIC

“This riveting, brutally hilarious, ultra-dark novel is an explosive debut by Oyinkan Braithwaite, and heralds an exciting new literary voice… Delicious.”  —NYLON

"You can''t help flying through the pages.."  —BUZZFEED

"Feverishly hot."  PAULA HAWKINS, author of GIRL ON THE TRAIN

"Lethally elegant."  LUKE JENNINGS, author of KILLING EVE: Codename Villanelle

"Disturbing, sly and delicious."  AYOBAMI ADEBAYO, author of STAY WITH ME

“Oyinkan Braithwaite is rewriting the slasher novel, and man, does it look good.  My Sister, The Serial Killer is a wholly original novel where satire and serial killers brush up against each other… A terrific and clever novel about sisterhood and blurred lines of morality.”  —REFINERY29
 
“A rich, dark debut. . . . Evocative of the murderously eccentric Brewster sisters from the classic play and film “Arsenic and Old Lace,” . . . Braithwaite doesn’t mock the murders as comic fodder, and that’s just one of the unexpected pleasures of her quirky novel. . . . A clever, affecting examination of siblings bound by a secret with a body count.”  —BOSTON GLOBE

“A biting mix of wickedness and wit, Oyinkan Braithwaite weaves her narrative with a confidence that you''ve never read anything quite like it.”  INSTYLE

"Braithwaite’s blazing debut is as sharp as a knife...bitingly funny and brilliantly executed, with not a single word out of place."  —PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, (starred review)

"Strange, funny and oddly touching...Pretty much perfect...It wears its weirdness excellently."  —LITHUB

"Who is more dangerous? A femme fatale murderess or the quiet, plain woman who cleans up her messes? I never knew what was going to happen, but found myself pulling for  both sisters, as I relished the creepiness and humor of this modern noir."  HELEN ELLIS, author of AMERICAN HOUSEWIFE

"A gem, in the most accurate sense: small, hard, sharp, and polished to perfection. Every pill-sized chapter is exemplary."  EDGAR CANTERO, author of MEDDLING KIDS

"Sly, risky, and filled with surprises, Oyinkan Braithwaite holds nothing back in this wry and refreshingly inventive novel about violence, sister rivalries and simply staying alive."  IDRA NOVEY, author of THOSE WHO KNEW

About the Author

Oyinkan Braithwaite is a graduate of Kingston University in Creative Writing and Law. Following her degree, she worked as an assistant editor at Kachifo Limited, a Nigerian publishing house, and as a production manager at Ajapaworld, a children''s educational and entertainment company. She now works as a freelance writer and editor. In 2014, she was shortlisted as a top-ten spoken-word artist in the Eko Poetry Slam, and in 2016 she was a finalist for the Commonwealth Short Story Prize. She lives in Lagos, Nigeria.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Words

Ayoola summons me with these words—Korede, I killed him.

I had hoped I would never hear those words again.
 

Bleach

I bet you didn’t know that bleach masks the smell of blood. Most people use bleach indiscriminately, assum­ing it is a catchall product, never taking the time to read the list of ingredients on the back, never taking the time to return to the recently wiped surface to take a closer look. Bleach will disinfect, but it’s not great for cleaning residue, so I use it only after I have first scrubbed the bathroom of all traces of life, and death.

It is clear that the room we are in has been remod­eled recently. It has that never-been-used look, especially now that I’ve spent close to three hours cleaning up. The hardest part was getting to the blood that had seeped in between the shower and the caulking. It’s an easy part to forget.

There’s nothing placed on any of the surfaces; his shower gel, toothbrush and toothpaste are all stored in the cabinet above the sink. Then there’s the shower mat—a black smiley face on a yellow rectangle in an otherwise white room.

Ayoola is perched on the toilet seat, her knees raised and her arms wrapped around them. The blood on her dress has dried and there is no risk that it will drip on the white, now glossy floors. Her dreadlocks are piled atop her head, so they don’t sweep the ground. She keeps looking up at me with her big brown eyes, afraid that I am angry, that I will soon get off my hands and knees to lecture her.

I am not angry. If I am anything, I am tired. The sweat from my brow drips onto the floor and I use the blue sponge to wipe it away.

I was about to eat when she called me. I had laid everything out on the tray in preparation—the fork was to the left of the plate, the knife to the right. I folded the napkin into the shape of a crown and placed it at the center of the plate. The movie was paused at the begin­ning credits and the oven timer had just rung, when my phone began to vibrate violently on my table.

By the time I get home, the food will be cold.

I stand up and rinse the gloves in the sink, but I don’t remove them. Ayoola is looking at my reflection in the mirror.

“We need to move the body,” I tell her.

“Are you angry at me?”

Perhaps a normal person would be angry, but what I feel now is a pressing need to dispose of the body. When I got here, we carried him to the boot of my car, so that I was free to scrub and mop without having to countenance his cold stare.

“Get your bag,” I reply.

We return to the car and he is still in the boot, wait­ing for us.

The third mainland bridge gets little to no traffic at this time of night, and since there are no lamplights, it’s almost pitch black, but if you look beyond the bridge you can see the lights of the city. We take him to where we took the last one—over the bridge and into the water. At least he won’t be lonely.

Some of the blood has seeped into the lining of the boot. Ayoola offers to clean it, out of guilt, but I take my homemade mixture of one spoon of ammonia to two cups of water from her and pour it over the stain. I don’t know whether or not they have the tech for a thorough crime scene investigation in Lagos, but Ayoola could never clean up as efficiently as I can.
 

The Notebook

“Who was he?”

“Femi.”

I scribble the name down. We are in my bedroom. Ayoola is sitting cross-legged on my sofa, her head resting on the back of the cushion. While she took a bath, I set the dress she had been wearing on fire. Now she wears a rose-colored T‑shirt and smells of baby powder.

“And his surname?”

She frowns, pressing her lips together, and then she shakes her head, as though trying to shake the name back into the forefront of her brain. It doesn’t come. She shrugs. I should have taken his wallet.

I close the notebook. It is small, smaller than the palm of my hand. I watched a TEDx video once where the man said that carrying around a notebook and pen­ning one happy moment each day had changed his life. That is why I bought the notebook. On the first page, I wrote, I saw a white owl through my bedroom window. The notebook has been mostly empty since.

“It’s not my fault, you know.” But I don’t know. I don’t know what she is referring to. Does she mean the inabil­ity to recall his surname? Or his death?

“Tell me what happened.”
 

The Poem

Femi wrote her a poem.

(She can remember the poem, but she cannot remem­ber his last name.)

I dare you to find a flaw
in her beauty;
or to bring forth a woman
who can stand beside
her without wilting.

And he gave it to her written on a piece of paper, folded twice, reminiscent of our secondary school days, when kids would pass love notes to one another in the back row of classrooms. She was moved by all this (but then Ayoola is always moved by the worship of her merits) and so she agreed to be his woman.

On their one-month anniversary, she stabbed him in the bathroom of his apartment. She didn’t mean to, of course. He was angry, screaming at her, his onion-stained breath hot against her face.

(But why was she carrying the knife?)

The knife was for her protection. You never knew with men, they wanted what they wanted when they wanted it. She didn’t mean to kill him, she wanted to warn him off, but he wasn’t scared of her weapon. He was over six feet tall and she must have looked like a doll to him, with her small frame, long eyelashes and rosy, full lips.

(Her description, not mine.)

She killed him on the first strike, a jab straight to the heart. But then she stabbed him twice more to be sure. He sank to the floor. She could hear her own breathing and nothing else.

 
Body

Have you heard this one before? Two girls walk into a room. The room is in a flat. The flat is on the third floor. In the room is the dead body of an adult male. How do they get the body to the ground floor without being seen?

First, they gather supplies.

“How many bedsheets do we need?”

“How many does he have?” Ayoola ran out of the bathroom and returned armed with the information that there were five sheets in his laundry cupboard. I bit my lip. We needed a lot, but I was afraid his family might notice if the only sheet he had was the one laid on his bed. For the average male, this wouldn’t be all that peculiar—but this man was meticulous. His bookshelf was arranged alphabetically by author. His bathroom was stocked with the full range of cleaning supplies; he even bought the same brand of disinfectant as I did. And his kitchen shone. Ayoola seemed out of place here—a blight in an otherwise pure existence.

“Bring three.”

Second, they clean up the blood.

I soaked up the blood with a towel and wrung it out in the sink. I repeated the motions until the floor was dry. Ayoola hovered, leaning on one foot and then the other. I ignored her impatience. It takes a whole lot longer to dispose of a body than to dispose of a soul, especially if you don’t want to leave any evidence of foul play. But my eyes kept darting to the slumped corpse, propped up against the wall. I wouldn’t be able to do a thorough job until his body was elsewhere.

Third, they turn him into a mummy.

We laid the sheets out on the now dry floor and she rolled him onto them. I didn’t want to touch him. I could make out his sculpted body beneath his white tee. He looked like a man who could survive a couple of flesh wounds, but then so had Achilles and Caesar. It was a shame to think that death would whittle away at his broad shoulders and concave abs, until he was nothing more than bone. When I first walked in I had checked his pulse thrice, and then thrice more. He could have been sleeping, he looked so peaceful. His head was bent low, his back curved against the wall, his legs askew.

Ayoola huffed and puffed as she pushed his body onto the sheets. She wiped the sweat off her brow and left a trace of blood there. She tucked one side of a sheet over him, hiding him from view. Then I helped her roll him and wrap him firmly within the sheets. We stood and looked at him.

“What now?” she asked.

Fourth, they move the body.

We could have used the stairs, but I imagined us car­rying what was clearly a crudely swaddled body and meeting someone on our way. I made up a couple of possible explanations—

“We are playing a prank on my brother. He is a deep sleeper and we are moving his sleeping body elsewhere.”

“No, no, it’s not a real man, what do you take us for? It’s a mannequin.”

“No, ma, it is just a sack of potatoes.”

I pictured the eyes of my make-believe witness wid­ening in fear, as he or she ran to safety. No, the stairs were out of the question.

“We need to take the lift.”

Ayoola opened her mouth to ask a question and then she shook her head and closed it again. She had done her bit, the rest she left to me. We lifted him. I should have used my knees and not my back. I felt something crack and dropped my end of the body with a thud. My sister rolled her eyes. I took his feet again, and we car­ried him to the doorway.

Ayoola darted to the lift, pressed the button, ran back to us and lifted Femi’s shoulders once more. I peeked out of the apartment and confirmed that the landing was still clear. I was tempted to pray, to beg that no door be opened as we journeyed from door to lift, but I am fairly certain that those are exactly the types of prayers He doesn’t answer. So I chose instead to rely on luck and speed. We silently shuffled across the stone floor. The lift dinged just in time and opened its mouth for us. We stayed to one side while I confirmed that the lift was empty, and then we heaved him in, bundling him into the corner, away from immediate view.

“Please hold the lift!” cried a voice. From the corner of my eye, I saw Ayoola about to press the button, the one that stops the lift from closing its doors. I slapped her hand away and jabbed the ground button repeat­edly. As the lift doors slid shut, I caught a glimpse of a young mother’s disappointed face. I felt a little guilty—she had a baby in one arm and bags in the other—but I did not feel guilty enough to risk incarceration. Besides, what good could she be up to moving around at that hour, with a child in tow?

“What is wrong with you?” I hissed at Ayoola, even though I knew her movement had been instinctive, pos­sibly the same impulsiveness that caused her to drive knife into flesh.

“My bad,” was her only response. I swallowed the words that threatened to spill out of my mouth. This was not the time.

On the ground floor, I left Ayoola to guard the body and hold the lift. If anyone was coming toward her, she was to shut the doors and go to the top floor. If someone attempted to call it from another floor, she was to hold the lift doors. I ran to get my car and drove it to the back door of the apartment building, where we fetched the body from the lift. My heart only stopped hammering in my chest when we shut the boot.

Fifth, they bleach.
 

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.2 out of 54.2 out of 5
10,089 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Amazon Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not Worth The Money
Reviewed in the United States on December 21, 2018
I was excited to read this as part of a famous book club. I had to keep myself interested as I read because I just didn’t want to finish it and when I did I was sorry I hasn’t given it up earlier. Not well written and the ending was just horrible! Don’t let famous people... See more
I was excited to read this as part of a famous book club. I had to keep myself interested as I read because I just didn’t want to finish it and when I did I was sorry I hasn’t given it up earlier. Not well written and the ending was just horrible! Don’t let famous people trick you into reading crap like they did me!
58 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
L-Booknerd
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Modern Noir At Its Finest....
Reviewed in the United States on December 5, 2018
Absurd and smart at the same time. Just the right book to pick up if you want some mindless entertainment. It is well written, but the actual story is the true gem. It doesn''t get any better than a femme fatale and her co-dependent sister covering up murders. I wanted it to... See more
Absurd and smart at the same time. Just the right book to pick up if you want some mindless entertainment. It is well written, but the actual story is the true gem. It doesn''t get any better than a femme fatale and her co-dependent sister covering up murders. I wanted it to end differently, but it''s still an enjoyable read.
60 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Dave Schwinghammer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
How Will it All End?
Reviewed in the United States on December 9, 2018
MY SISTER, THE SERIAL KILLER, the subject of a recent TIME magazine review, was written by a Nigerian novelist, Oyinkan, Braithwaite, and as such is an intriguing read. The book is not so much different than any other serial killer novel in respect to voice.... See more
MY SISTER, THE SERIAL KILLER, the subject of a recent TIME magazine review, was written by a Nigerian novelist, Oyinkan, Braithwaite, and as such is an intriguing read.

The book is not so much different than any other serial killer novel in respect to voice. There''s only the occasional dialect reference. Instead of the Canadian “eh?'' we get an “o”. Instead of maam we get “ma,” at least that''s my best guess, but it''s mostly told in standard English by an educated narrator.

The book starts with the murder of Koreda''s younger sister''s Ayoola''s boyfriend with a knife. She''s only 5'' 2” and he''s over six feet tall, but he wasn''t expecting her to stab him with a six inch pig-sticker she got from her father''s desk after he died. Rather than call the cops, Koreda, who happens to be a nurse, helps her clean up the mess and get rid of the body. We''re told this is the third boyfriend, which makes Ayoola a serial killer.

Koreda loves her sister; they slept together and occasionally still do, but only as normal sisters would. Nothing hinky there. There is lots of jealousy on Koreda''s part. Ayoola is very beautiful and she attracts men with little effort. Koreda is rather plain. Koreda is also in love with Tade a good-natured doctor at the hospital.

Koreda visits a man who has been in a coma for some time, thinking he''ll never wake up. She tells him all about her sister and the angst involved in not being able to bring herself to do anything about the murders. She''s implicated herself, after all.

Ayoola is also a fashion designer, her schooling paid for by a sugar daddy who also helped her start her business. They go off on a vacation in Dubai. Prior to this Koreda has easily snatched Tade away from Koreda, but she doesn''t seem to think there''s anything unusual about running off with another man. During the vacation, she changes her M.O. a bit. Of course she puts the weight on Koreda.

Oh, yes, the girls'' father was abusive; there''s a scene where he punishes Ayoola with his belt; Koreda tries to save her but gets in the way of the belt more than helping Ayoola.

So . . . Koreda uses their upbringing as an excuse for why Ayoola is doing what she''s doing. There''s another scene where Ayoola takes the blame for something Koreda did.

The climax arrives with a big complication. Somebody besides Koreda knows what Ayoola has been doing. Think about who that might be. And Ayoola is stabbed herself. Let''s just say she asked for it, but the wrong person pays when Koreda continues to protect her sister.

How will it all end?
42 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
SassyPants
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Bloody Good Book!
Reviewed in the United States on February 8, 2019
I had been hearing about this book long before it was published and was eager to read it. It was the perfect thing to pick up right before Valentine’s Day! While many of the professional reviews focus on the humor (witty, pulpy, darkly funny) the book is more than that.... See more
I had been hearing about this book long before it was published and was eager to read it. It was the perfect thing to pick up right before Valentine’s Day! While many of the professional reviews focus on the humor (witty, pulpy, darkly funny) the book is more than that. It is also about family loyalty and women’s place in Nigerian society. It is also about misperceptions and the things we chose to ignore about those we love.

Korede is the older sister. She is a nurse who is very responsible and plays by the rules. Fortunately for her younger sister Ayoola, Korede also knows how to clean up a crime scene! Ayoola is beautiful, creative, and gets everything she wants. She also has the bad habit of killing off her boyfriends. Korede begrudgingly helps her sister hide the evidence and also keeps her from giving away their secrets. That is until Ayoola catches the eye of a young doctor who Korede has been pining for herself. Should she try to save him? Can she? Will he believe her?

The book is written in short chapters that are as sharp as Ayoola’s knife. As the story of the sisters, their mother, and their deceased father unfold, you begin to understand how Ayoola developed into a murderess. This is a short book and a quick read. There is a lot left unsaid. There are some nice twists and I think that the ending is left open to some interpretation. In my opinion, Korede does not know her sister as well as she believes and is as easily manipulated as Ayoola’s boyfriends. This book is as darkly fun as it is psychologically sophisticated.
32 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Crystals_Library
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wonderful Debut Novella!
Reviewed in the United States on December 5, 2018
I really enjoyed this novella. I finished it in about 3 hours. It is about two sisters, one who is a serial killer and the other is a nurse who cleans up after her sister''s crimes. They live in Lagos, Nigeria. The premise of the book seems very... See more
I really enjoyed this novella. I finished it in about 3 hours.

It is about two sisters, one who is a serial killer and the other is a nurse who cleans up after her sister''s crimes. They live in Lagos, Nigeria.

The premise of the book seems very realistic. The girls were raised by a very abusive father and don''t know what real love looks like. However, there is a strong aspect of satire because everything is so extreme. One sister is extremely beautiful while the other is apparently very unattractive. The crimes were over the top and the lack of investigation into the crimes was laughable.

I am looking forward to reading Oyinkan Braithwaite''s future writing.
35 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
J-Phi
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I liked this a lot.
Reviewed in the United States on December 12, 2018
This darkly humorous novel tells the story of Korede, the ugly duckling elder sister of a younger sister who is the darling of everyone but who happens to be a serial killer. The writing in this is fabulously accessible and if even for a moment you’ve ever felt like the... See more
This darkly humorous novel tells the story of Korede, the ugly duckling elder sister of a younger sister who is the darling of everyone but who happens to be a serial killer. The writing in this is fabulously accessible and if even for a moment you’ve ever felt like the wallflower or overlooked in any way, Korede’s narrative will have you nodding your head in empathy. This novel despite the macabre themes is light enough that you don’t feel the heaviness and darkness even in the tragic backstory of Korede’s Family. There’s no message or real theme here beyond the simple question that asks you what you’d do for loyalty to protect your family. To me, this is pure, dark, grisly fun and I highly recommend.
31 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Leslie A.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Quick but enthralling read
Reviewed in the United States on November 24, 2018
As fascinated with true crime as I am I must admit to not being a reader of crime, or murder but something about this caught my eye and I''m glad I read it. It''s not a full length novel, but a concise tale that leaves you wondering where else the story could go. The... See more
As fascinated with true crime as I am I must admit to not being a reader of crime, or murder but something about this caught my eye and I''m glad I read it. It''s not a full length novel, but a concise tale that leaves you wondering where else the story could go. The setting gives some insight int a culture I am unfamiliar with and how different law enforcement agencies around the world can be. Well worth the price and small time investment for a gripping tale.
28 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Discerning Shopper
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Loved it!
Reviewed in the United States on December 19, 2018
I''m not great at writing reviews, but when I love a book, I feel the author deserves some praise. The book is a quick read, with short chapters of just a couple pages. The story is much deeper and more nuanced than you first assume, as more history is revealed. I felt I... See more
I''m not great at writing reviews, but when I love a book, I feel the author deserves some praise. The book is a quick read, with short chapters of just a couple pages. The story is much deeper and more nuanced than you first assume, as more history is revealed. I felt I could hear the author''s Nigerian accent as I read the story. The story seems humorous, but is also a stark tale of a hard life. I look forward to reading more by this author.
18 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

D. Beecher
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I''m ready for Nolly Noir to be a thing.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 9, 2019
The hype around this book was 100% justified. This is a masterclass in tension, creating it, relaxing it a little and then pulling it tight again. It is likely to be shelved in crime, but I feel that structurally it owes a lot to horror. I had to read it in bites, which is...See more
The hype around this book was 100% justified. This is a masterclass in tension, creating it, relaxing it a little and then pulling it tight again. It is likely to be shelved in crime, but I feel that structurally it owes a lot to horror. I had to read it in bites, which is unusual for me, but I was having these “I can’t watch.” moments where I had to take a break and get my emotional equilibrium back before I returned to the characters. There is a freshness to the piece. There is nothing obvious about the plot. The characters are well rounded and treated with respect. The Sisterly relationship is just perfect. There are some interesting choices in chapter length which I think work well and the style is suitably economical and spare for a piece of Noir. It is what I call genre+ where a writer takes genre structures and uses them as a springboard for something that bit elevated. I loved Korede and loved the way she was drawn down into a moral quagmire by Braithwaite. All the external motivations and internal motivations lead inexorably to a satisfying conclusion. Where I have my only note of criticism, I think the ending could have been written into a little more. I like it, I just think it needed to be expanded a little more. This is the perfect book to be turned into a movie, and Working Title have already bought the option. I just hope they do it justice because this could be such a good movie.
150 people found this helpful
Report
FictionLover
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
At last, a serial killer story I WANT to read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 17, 2019
I heard about the author from a post on a writers’ group and d/l a sample of My Sister, the Serial Killer. I was hooked from the outset and bought the book. Oyinkan Braithwaite (OB) has subverted and refashioned ‘crime’ and produced a near-perfect noir except for a couple...See more
I heard about the author from a post on a writers’ group and d/l a sample of My Sister, the Serial Killer. I was hooked from the outset and bought the book. Oyinkan Braithwaite (OB) has subverted and refashioned ‘crime’ and produced a near-perfect noir except for a couple of important things – and I will come to those later - but they should not stop you from getting a copy pronto, taking the phone off the hook (as people used to say) and refusing to speak to anyone unless the house is burning down. Yes, it is that good. The voice of the book is Korede’s, elder sister to Ayoola, the former a hospital nurse, tall, angular and not pretty (as she tells us), the latter an exquisitely beautiful wild child, utterly devastating, self centred and lacking any right-wrong moral sense. There is a mother but the father is ten years dead, though he looms back into Korede’s present; he was a domestic tyrant of absolutely the worst kind. I don’t do spoilers but it suffices that the title announces the novel for what it is, but how it unfolds shows the young author to be a very bright star in the sky. The chapters are many and short, some a single paragraph, a page, max four – we should call them ‘scenes’. Each is headed by a word, usually one word, which signals the intent of the scene. The story has two locations: home for the family, a compound in Lagos in a large house, and the hospital where Korede works and where she moons and swoons over a handsome doctor who barely acknowledges her. OB’s writing has that wonderful thing where I felt transported to this part of West Africa. When Ayoola waltzes in one day at her sister’s place of work to ‘Take you to lunch’ (no, it is a kind of spying), the handsome doctor sees the sister and the amorous fireworks start. Korede also has a confessor, a patient in a coma whom she visits, sits with and pours out her sister’s doings. Of course, there is a consequence to this that you can probably guess. This is also a book with Nigerian culture stitched into it. People routinely, it seems tell lies, use astonishing verbal and mental juggling to turn black into white and guilt into innocence, the dexterity and virtuosity of which makes Donald Trump look like a beginner - and corruption is everywhere. Also the marriage plotting and scheming of the sisters’ mother is not a million miles from Jewish mothers in NYC. There is a fearsome patriarchy and where women are treated badly: make that very badly. There are Nigerian words, some in the alphabet I am using, others in a strange mix of letters with accent markings that are probably Yoruba – and I would have liked an end of book glossary – there is appreciable cooking and, well, I wanted to know what they were eating. It is a terrific read. OB suffered terrible writer’s block (see article, The Guardian, 15 Jan) and wrote MSTSK in a kind of desperation (hey girl, feel your pain, we’ve all been there). But I cannot give the fifth star, because of the ending. It is unsatisfying, ambiguous and for such a gifted young writer a bit lazy. Her editors should have known better, but perhaps they were thinking of a sequel – please, no – the story does not have the legs for it. Now: buy it!
95 people found this helpful
Report
Kay Smillie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Easy Reading, But Thought-Provoking
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 24, 2019
A crime novel with short, punchy chapters, and a garishly neon cover that is so, "Come on, I DARE you to read me!" You''re not supposed to like or take the side of a serial killer - and by God, I didn''t! Ayoola is beautiful, seems to be bláse about everything, and a...See more
A crime novel with short, punchy chapters, and a garishly neon cover that is so, "Come on, I DARE you to read me!" You''re not supposed to like or take the side of a serial killer - and by God, I didn''t! Ayoola is beautiful, seems to be bláse about everything, and a psychopathic killer. She gets her sister, Korede, to clean up after her. I''m torn between Ayoola playing a game or just showing her true nature. I don''t think she''s that intelligent to play a game, but I could be wrong. Korede''s only ''therapy'' comes in the form of a dying man in a coma. Well, he''s not going to tell anyone, is he? This would be a fantastic tale for a book club to discuss. It seems a simplistic story, however it is not. It is chock full of questions. Some of which are: the roles women play in Nigeria; the roles of older and younger sisters; is anyone in this book real?; why is Ayoola killing men?; is blood thicker than water, is that why Korede backs her sister completely? Sharp, shocking, intelligent, and a definite page-turner.
60 people found this helpful
Report
Mr G
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Really nothing to write home about
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 20, 2019
The blurb of this book reads as a dream. Comic, tense, about serial killer sisters and lets face it serial killers are so hot right now. I dont remember it being particularly funny, certainly not laugh out loud. The tension was minimal and there are basically no murders in...See more
The blurb of this book reads as a dream. Comic, tense, about serial killer sisters and lets face it serial killers are so hot right now. I dont remember it being particularly funny, certainly not laugh out loud. The tension was minimal and there are basically no murders in the pages. The near lack of action leads you building up to the last pages thinking its all happening now, its all coming to a head and the action is about to happen when it just ends. It just bloody ends. Its not a cliffhanger its not a twist, theres no resolution it just stops. I wouldnt accept such a mild ending at the end of an episode of Coronation Street. It’s built to be a corker and was in all just disappointing
57 people found this helpful
Report
Much Ado
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s a Family Story
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 19, 2019
I enjoyed this book, most of which I read in an afternoon. There''s no "who done it" here--the sister is indeed a serial killer, so no spoiler alert required. The surprise is more that this is a family story with fully drawn characters who have some issues, shall we say. The...See more
I enjoyed this book, most of which I read in an afternoon. There''s no "who done it" here--the sister is indeed a serial killer, so no spoiler alert required. The surprise is more that this is a family story with fully drawn characters who have some issues, shall we say. The author ensures that you care about them. The topics are pretty serious but overall, this is an entertaining story, well written. I definitely recommend it!
50 people found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Explore similar books

Tags that will help you discover similar books. 16 tags
Results for: 
Where do clickable book tags come from?

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale

My Sister, the wholesale Serial Killer: discount A Novel outlet sale