Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online
Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online_top
Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online__right

Cover or corners may show light wear. Otherwise a gently used copy. Free shipping directly from Amazon Prime with hassle-free returns means your satisfaction guaranteed.
See more
Sold by River Prairie Products and fulfilled by Amazon.
[{"displayPrice":"$15.29","priceAmount":15.29,"currencySymbol":"$","integerValue":"15","decimalSeparator":".","fractionalValue":"29","symbolPosition":"left","hasSpace":false,"showFractionalPartIfEmpty":true,"offerListingId":"Be9GfLpWEmGdnztHuEI6jbyUPJhxA6ETwa7HSmtl5WJgZTEJdbUCdH3Uj5XrI%2B3%2BUKosDHmtoCEW8nmnHmhS4uAjhLBuPN0KgE76j%2BSi4X6Mhyx5bGDENEU5NCnZXikwKM0xIIhXzqY%3D","locale":"en-US","buyingOptionType":"NEW"},{"displayPrice":"$9.26","priceAmount":9.26,"currencySymbol":"$","integerValue":"9","decimalSeparator":".","fractionalValue":"26","symbolPosition":"left","hasSpace":false,"showFractionalPartIfEmpty":true,"offerListingId":"%2Be%2B9h4ldu5V4M9rB4aKet7xFDVRdy6ZPS40SAdllUVYy4LtRpTaAQQaIUASgJ66X5xLC4sxFYbt1llBdBJAIYfDzYku0cMxXucUOrg7XBOO31JfaJfdj4ekMIO1AQZaX9RKKesl9kFYscJwi6XGC1qnvSmExEewsC7ekeD8dzjen9yUZLWnoxQ%3D%3D","locale":"en-US","buyingOptionType":"USED"}]
$$15.29 () Includes selected options. Includes initial monthly payment and selected options. Details
Price
Subtotal
$$15.29
Subtotal
Initial payment breakdown
Shipping cost, delivery date, and order total (including tax) shown at checkout.
ADD TO LIST
Available at a lower price from other sellers that may not offer free Prime shipping.
SELL ON AMAZON
Share this product with friends
Text Message
WhatsApp
Copy
press and hold to copy
Email
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Loading your book clubs
There was a problem loading your book clubs. Please try again.
Not in a club? Learn more
Join or create book clubs
Choose books together
Track your books
Bring your club to Amazon Book Clubs, start a new book club and invite your friends to join, or find a club that’s right for you for free. Explore Amazon Book Clubs
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Frequently bought together

+
+
Choose items to buy together.
Buy all three: $40.77
$15.29
$11.99
$13.49
Some of these items ship sooner than the others.
Total price:
To see our price, add these items to your cart.

Frequently bought together

by Stephen Nachmanovitch
$15.29
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.00.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
by Erling Kagge
$11.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.00.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
by Epictetus
$13.49
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.00.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Book details

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Description

Product Description

Free Play is about the inner sources of spontaneous creation. It is about where art in the widest sense comes from. It is about why we create and what we learn when we do. It is about the flow of unhindered creative energy: the joy of making art in all its varied forms.

Free Play is directed toward people in any field who want to contact, honor, and strengthen their own creative powers. It integrates material from a wide variety of sources among the arts, sciences, and spiritual traditions of humanity. Filled with unusual quotes, amusing and illuminating anecdotes, and original metaphors, it reveals how inspiration arises within us, how that inspiration may be blocked, derailed or obscured by certain unavoidable facts of life, and how finally it can be liberated - how we can be liberated - to speak or sing, write or paint, dance or play, with our own authentic voice.

The whole enterprise of improvisation in life and art, of recovering free play and awakening creativity, is about being true to ourselves and our visions. It brings us into direct, active contact with boundless creative energies that we may not even know we had.

Review

"Stephen Nachmanovitch has produced a celebration of human uniqueness. What it amounts to is a guide for gettingthe most out of whatever is possible "
Norman Cousins, author of The Anatomy of an Illness

"This is an unusually intense, packed, thought-through book on the most difficult subject in the world: mystic creativity. If you wantto be intellectually informed about how people actually craete things, then you should read it at least once."
Robert Pirsig, author of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

"Would that Free Play found its way into every school, office, hospital, and factory. It is a most exciting book and a most important one."
Yehudi Menuhin, violinist

"Nachmanovitch tells it like it is in the most important book on improvisation I''ve yet seen."
Keith Jarrett, pianist

" Free Play is a superb guide for anyone who aspires to create, whatever medium."
—New Woman

"This book is important not only because it delves into the creative process, but also because Nachmanovitch creates the opportunity for the reader to get in touch with her/his own creative possibilities and abilities."
—Harvard Educational Review
 

From the Inside Flap

(see description)

About the Author

Stephen Nachmanovitch performs and teaches internationally as an improvisational violinist, and at the intersections of music, dance, theater, and multimedia arts. He is the author of Free Play: Improvisation in Life and Art (Penguin, 1990). Born in 1950, he studied at Harvard and the University of California, where he earned a Ph.D. in the History of Consciousness for an exploration of William Blake. His mentor was the anthropologist and philosopher Gregory Bateson. He has taught and lectured widely in the United States and abroad on creativity and the spiritual underpinnings of art. In the 1970''s he was a pioneer in free improvisation on violin, viola and electric violin. He has presented master classes and workshops at many conservatories and universities, and has had numerous appearances on radio, television, and at music and theater festivals. He has collaborated with other artists in media including music, dance, theater, and film, and has developed programs melding art, music, literature, and computer technology. He has published articles in a variety of fields since 1966, and has created computer software including The World Music Menu and Visual Music Tone Painter . He lives with his wife and two sons in Charlottesville, Virginia.
He is currently performing, recording, teaching, writing, and obsessed with the improvisational possibilities of the viola d''amore.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Table of Contents

 

Title Page

Copyright Page

Epigraph

Acknowledgements

Introduction

 

The Sources

Inspiration and Time’s Flow

The Vehicle

The Stream

The Muse

Mind at Play

Disappearing

 

The Work

Sex and Violins

Practice

The Power of Limits

The Power of Mistakes

Playing Together

Form Unfolding

 

Obstacles and Openings

Childhood’s End

Vicious Circles

The Judging Spectre

Surrender

Patience

Ripening

 

The Fruits

Eros and Creation

Quality

Art for Life’s Sake

Heartbreakthrough

 

Notes

Bibliography

Illustrations

About the Author

Most Tarcher/Putnam books are available at special quantity
discounts for bulk purchases for sales promotions, premiums,
fund-raising, and educational needs. Special books or book
excerpts also can be created to fit specific needs.
For details, write Putnam Special Markets
375 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10014

 

 

Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam
a member of
Penguin Putnam Inc.
375 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10014
www.penguinputnam.com

The author thanks the following for their permission to reprint from copyrighted works.

 

Constance Crown, for Hands by Rico Lebrun.
Walter Gruen, for Musica Solar by Remedios Varo.
Ben Berzinsky, for his photograph of a Carlo Bergonzi violin, c. 1770.
Grateful thanks to the late Arnold Fawcus of the Trianon Press, Paris, for permission to
photograph his magnificent William Blake books.
Artist Rights Society, Inc., for Two Children Drawing and Dawn Song by Pablo Picasso. © ARS
N.Y./SPADEM.
Charles E. Tuttle Co., Tokyo, Japan, for Tomikichiro Tokuriki’s Riding the Bull Home.
North Point Press, for excerpt from Wendell Berry’s essay, Poetry and Marriage.
For M. C. Escher’s Encounter © 1989 M. C. Escher Heirs/Cordon Art, Baarn, Holland.
Excerpts from “Burnt Norton” and “Little Gidding” in Four Quartets, © 1943 by T. S. Eliot
and renewed 1971 by Esme Valerie Eliot, .
Excerpt from The Secret of the Golden Flower: A Chinese Book of Life. Introduction by Carl Jung,
translated and explained by Richard Wilhelm, .
Excerpt from A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf, © 1929 by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich,
Inc. and renewed 1957 by Leonard Woolf, .
Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data
Nachmanovitch, Stephen.
Free play; improvisation in life and art / Stephen Nachmanovitch

 

p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references.

ISBN: 9781440673085

1. Creation (Literary, artistic, etc.) 2. Improvisation (Music)
I. Title.
BH301.C84N-49303
153.3’5-dc2O CIP

 

Copyright © 1990 by Stephen Nachmanovitch

Paint as you like and die happy.

HENRY MILLER

Acknowledgments

The following are only a few of the many friends and colleagues whose support, criticism, ideas, and other contributions were vital to the creation of this book:

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
307 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Synkoepator
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Simply stated, this book is unlike any other I‘ve ...
Reviewed in the United States on January 27, 2018
Simply stated, this book is unlike any other I‘ve personally been privileged to read. I find myself revisiting it’s content frequently as I find my way along a creative path. This journey, my journey, has been further informed by the most sincere and insightful wisdom found... See more
Simply stated, this book is unlike any other I‘ve personally been privileged to read. I find myself revisiting it’s content frequently as I find my way along a creative path. This journey, my journey, has been further informed by the most sincere and insightful wisdom found within. The depth of my understanding of living a creative life continues to deepen with each opportunity to evaluate, resonate and assimilate what lays at it’s heart. Stephen Nachmanovitch has delivered, at least to this traveler, with sincere intentions and remarkable clarity, a way in to the creative pursuit, it’s transformative possibilities and the joys which can accompany a recognition of work and play as one in the same. Treat yourself to this book and read it... over and over again!
17 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Rearden Steele
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the Best Improv Books
Reviewed in the United States on November 11, 2013
Since there are so many good reviews I chose begin with something slightly different so you could see the author''s background. Dr. Nachmanovitch''s PhD dissertation was on the History of Consciousness for an exploration of William Blake. This is significant... See more
Since there are so many good reviews I chose begin with something slightly different so you could see the author''s background.

Dr. Nachmanovitch''s PhD dissertation was on the History of Consciousness for an exploration of William Blake. This is significant because of Blake''s ideas and friends. Namely Blake was interested in Women''s rights, Thomas Paine was in his literary group and among other things Blake favored the freedom of the Colonies from Britain.

From this I got a sense that Nachmanovitch is someone I would like to meet. You may want to read more about Nachmanovitch and Blake elsewhere if you find the above a bit sparse.

The book asserts that anyone can improvise and that we all improvise every day in ordinary life when we drive down a street or have a conversation. These ideas are elaborated in simple terms showing how improvization applies to any field not just to Nachmanovitch''s field music.

I liked the book because it refers to the self in many places as being the source of inspiration rather that some sort of collective consciousness as many books of this nature do. although he does not rule that out - you can make your own choice. However his elaboration makes it clear that within the self there are components that interfere with improv that have to be transcended in order to be creative whether it be in business, medicine, or music. He does makes use of snippets from various sources but does not claim that his sources are of particular interest beyond the use he makes of them. For example to talks of Zen and the five fears of Buddhism but doesn''t otherwise claim to be a Buddhist. The quality of this work goes way beyond what could be said in a brief review. To appreciate the brilliance of this work read the book - it is well worth five stars!
16 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Doug Maliszewski
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Keys to Unlock your Creativity
Reviewed in the United States on March 18, 2013
This book had been lying on my shelf for a few years when I finally opened it and found some wonderful advice about how to approach improvisation and composition. Having been a serious musician for over 35 years, I am pretty confident in my abilities and suffer very little... See more
This book had been lying on my shelf for a few years when I finally opened it and found some wonderful advice about how to approach improvisation and composition. Having been a serious musician for over 35 years, I am pretty confident in my abilities and suffer very little anxiety when I know I will have to improvise for a crowd of people. The one thing that I have noticed--and this book addresses, is that the daily grind, the endless tasks of survival, and just the passing of time can have a negative affect on that part of me from which improvisation originates.

It can be very easy to lean-on techniques and tricks that have been ingrained and become like an old pair of shoes, however the freshness and excitement of playing can suffer thus making the improvization seem "stilted" or "scripted" to the discerning ear. Reading this book illuminated all the pitfalls of trying to perform/compose while being in the wrong frame of mind and suggests zen-like ideas and games to loosen-up so the performer can be in the correct frame of mind thus allowing creativity and spontaneity to flow unimpeded, and that makes all the difference.

Yesterday I had a few hours scheduled to compose/record so I re-read several chapters before I headed to the studio. Some of suggestions that I took into the studio were:

1. Approach the subject material in a child-like manner like I was playing my instrument for the very first time.

2. Detatch from reality as much as possible and focus upon a muse or some inspirational event. I thought about this on my way to the studio and reflected upon the spirit of joy present during a recent childrens birthday party. I focused upon how I sat watching 5 chldren running around the house, tearing up the place all the while playing with great joy and abandon. How they were always in the moment unconcerned about the past or the future. How their play had a sense of urgency and longing as though they were more aware of their mortality than the adults sitting around watching.

I have to say that when I completed my work and listened back it was apparent that the message of this book is a very authentic one. The recording engineer remarked that the recording had a sense of urgency, fire, and a longing that at no time seemed stilted or forced, and that the accidents were happy accidents. I was satisfied with the session for I was able to pen the kernel of three new compositions and I look forward to getting back even more prepared to enter the correct mental zone. I was in the zone and know how to get back there when I need to.

I spend a great deal of time working my technique yet it seemed that just a little of this book went a long way. If you are unaware of how to improvise or are suffering from "old pair of shoes" syndrome I am sure that a dedicated reading of this book following by some effort will pay those invaluable dividends that are found in the greatest performances/recordings. If nothing more, it will force you to evaluate your approach towards you particular art form and if you are satisfied.

There is an Ambrose Bierce story about a shepherd who encountered a gorgeous woman while attending his flock. He had never seen a woman so lovely, so free, just wandering aimlessly about the countryside yet every time he tried to take hold of her she disaapeared. This kept happening and he fell into a dispondency until he happened upon a man who was wiser than he. The man pointed out that what he had encountered could not be tied down at all for it was the spirit of beauty and joy and it had to be enjoyed while it was there for it was both temporal and perenial.

I can think of no better example of what I found in this book for I know that when I improvise I am fliriting with the immortal and as a mortal I found this bit of wisdom alone makes all the difference.

thank you
19 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Karin Norgard
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
From a dancer''s perspective...
Reviewed in the United States on July 5, 2010
Improvisation seems to be a black hole in the social dance world. It is one of those skills that oftentimes seems underdeveloped, overdone, misunderstood, or ignored altogether. I have seen salsa instructors teach entire routines based on their own improvisations, only to... See more
Improvisation seems to be a black hole in the social dance world. It is one of those skills that oftentimes seems underdeveloped, overdone, misunderstood, or ignored altogether. I have seen salsa instructors teach entire routines based on their own improvisations, only to have them repeated by their students step-by-step on the social dance floor without a thought given to the dynamics of the music or relationship with one''s partner. All social dances suffer from a lack of understanding and lack of confidence among its participants when it comes to improvisation. And it seems there isn''t really a clear path for learning how to break away from the structure and attain that beautiful - and skillful - quality of spontaneous creativity.

Stephen Nachmanovitch''s beautiful book offers enriching reflections for any dancer to meditate on. The author himself is a musician and a poet, but he approaches improvisation and creativity in a way that is accessible to devotees of all art forms and every discipline in life that prizes being in the moment. He offers a number of examples from the worlds of art and music, but my dancer''s perspective did not have to make great leaps to apply these concepts to the skills required to improvise and express oneself on the dance floor.

What I found so refreshing about the book was how rich his thoughts are on the topic. After reading several books on mastery and creativity that seemed superficial, fluffy, and more like self-help literature than deep reflection and analysis, Nachmanovitch''s book was a true pleasure to delve into. His writing manages to be at once intellectual and inspiring while covering concepts such as the power of limits and mistakes, the value of inspiration and judgment, and the tension and reward of creative collaboration. These topics touch not only on musicality and improvisation but on technique and partnering as well. Though he never directly refers to the concept, a number of his thoughts seem to coincide perfectly with the conditions and characteristics of flow, and I finished his book with a more well-rounded appreciation of flow in social dance. I found it interesting to read in the author''s biography that he holds a PhD in the History of Consciousness.

Nachmanovitch''s own introduction offers great insight into his vision for Free Play: "I began writing this book as an exploration of the inner dimensions of improvisation. I found it inescapably fascinating that the conception, composition, practice, and performance of a piece of music could blossom in a single moment, and come out whole and satisfying. When I first found myself improvising, I felt with great excitement that I was onto something, a kind of spiritual connectedness that went far beyond the scope of music making. At the same time, improvisation extended the scope and relevance of music making until the artificial boundary between art and life disintegrated. I had found a freedom that was both exhilarating and exacting. Looking into the moment of improvisation, I was uncovering patterns related to every kind of creativity; uncovering clues as well to living a life that is self-creating, self-organizing, and authentic. I came to see improvisation as a master key to creativity."

I always try to balance my reviews by offering constructive criticism and areas for improvement. However, this book did not really allow me room to do so. While some chapters were more interesting and applicable to the world of dance than others, I found so many gems throughout the book and have returned to it often since. While reading it will not directly improve one''s improvisation on the dance floor, for many dancers I believe it can provide the mental shift required to open oneself up to inner creativity, outward expression, and meaningful improvisation.
8 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
joshua m obusek
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
There were points that seemed to conflict with one another and I began to feel sad. That kind of sadness you feel when you ...
Reviewed in the United States on October 26, 2017
I started reading this book about 2 weeks ago. I am an artist and have been wanting very much to change direction in my work. I have been longing to create work more intuitively and without the crutches (crutches for me) of realism. I devoured the first half and the words... See more
I started reading this book about 2 weeks ago. I am an artist and have been wanting very much to change direction in my work. I have been longing to create work more intuitively and without the crutches (crutches for me) of realism. I devoured the first half and the words resonated deeply, but somewhere around the halfway point it began to lose it''s hold. I felt as though I was suddenly struggling to understand it and at some points felt confused. There were points that seemed to conflict with one another and I began to feel sad. That kind of sadness you feel when you think you''ve just found a new friend, a real connection, only to find out there is something about it that simply wont work. And sad, because when this sort of thing happens it makes me question the worth and validity of the parts I loved!
So, bottom line, the book starts out with so much inspiration and deep insightful views into human creativity and then fizzles into what feels like an effort to fill pages and cover some key topics that need to be addressed, but then aren''t elegantly addressed. They feel more like jumbled meandering words trying to articulate what cant be articulated.
14 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Gifted Ed Please
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent reminder that learning isn''t about passing tests
Reviewed in the United States on October 17, 2019
When will we go back to real learning!? Studying for exams is not real learning. This book reminds us to at least spend time on our own doing real learning while we may still need to act as robots for employers.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Free Play
Reviewed in the United States on April 12, 2010
I have been an artist, a writer, and teacher of creativity for many years. For the last five years I have interviewed artists, writers, composer, filmmakers, musicians, (and anyone else creative I can get my hands on) about their creative process. I was a... See more
I have been an artist, a writer, and teacher of creativity for many years. For the last five years I have interviewed artists, writers, composer, filmmakers, musicians, (and anyone else creative I can get my hands on) about their creative process.

I was a passionate collector of books on all aspects of creativity from business to fine arts.
Then a few years ago I found this little book. It said concisely and eloquently everything (and more) I would have said if I had wanted to write a book on creativity. I have lost count of the number of copies I have bought, shared, given away. I just bought another because I realized I had given my last copy away (again).

This is a book about how to understand what we do when we create (when we get it right) and why. I not only resonated with what he has written, I gained clarity and new ways to think about creativity.
Magnificent.
7 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
S. Howard
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Definitely inspires you to improvise more
Reviewed in the United States on December 19, 2012
My relationship with (musical) improvisation has had its ups and downs, but since reading Free Play, I''ve felt much more driven to practice improvisation and much less afraid of improvising in performances. I used to almost dread improvisational opportunities in performance... See more
My relationship with (musical) improvisation has had its ups and downs, but since reading Free Play, I''ve felt much more driven to practice improvisation and much less afraid of improvising in performances. I used to almost dread improvisational opportunities in performance and now I''m consistently excited about them. Nachmanovitch makes a good case for why improvisation is a unique and fascinating part of being a musician (and, as the title says, of life in general). And he clearly outlines the obstacles that most of us have felt instinctively at some point. I had started to notice that every time someone complimented one of my improvisations, I realized it was one where I''d stopped thinking and had no idea what I''d played. Free Play goes into depth on this. He gets into some pretty abstract, kind of spiritual stuff at times, particularly towards the end, which didn''t connect with me quite as much but I appreciated it and don''t think it took anything away from the book.

FYI, the book has some pictures which don''t come through great on the Kindle Paperwhite. Nothing central to the book.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

A reader
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 4, 2019
This is a book that demands to be read slowly and gently. It contains lots of things to think about, and it''s one of those rare books that you will want to read again and again. I thoroughly enjoyed this.
2 people found this helpful
Report
Steve
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lots of fine words
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 29, 2020
Having read the book in stages and getting totally lost in the dialog will have to reread to make sense of it. Seemed too intellectual for me durr! I am just an ordinary engineer/artist/musician/craftsman who looks for concise information.
Report
Marlene Brown
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Inspirational
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 30, 2013
Found the gentle advice contained within this small book uplifting, thoughtful and wise. Particularly useful was the chapter on ''surrender'' which considers the nature of intuition as ''the unconscious made conscious''. Nachmanovitch tells us that "...to create you have to...See more
Found the gentle advice contained within this small book uplifting, thoughtful and wise. Particularly useful was the chapter on ''surrender'' which considers the nature of intuition as ''the unconscious made conscious''. Nachmanovitch tells us that "...to create you have to disappear" and then goes on to guide us in getting out of our own way. I have notated this book throughout (a bit naughty, I know) and will return to it again and again. A treasure trove of insight.
One person found this helpful
Report
Mrs Pauline H . A . Munns
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 9, 2018
I found this book very helpful in freeing up my thinking about my art practice.
Report
francesca alden-fenn
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Food for thaught
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 13, 2014
Good advice on ''letting go'' of your fears of making mistakes in music playing. Refreshing viewpoint on alowing yourself to explore though ''play'', your own musical personality; A revilation to realise that there is SO much more to playing an instrament that getting all the...See more
Good advice on ''letting go'' of your fears of making mistakes in music playing. Refreshing viewpoint on alowing yourself to explore though ''play'', your own musical personality; A revilation to realise that there is SO much more to playing an instrament that getting all the ''playing of the notes'' exatly as printed!!
2 people found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • creation science
  • bach and beethoven
  • color in art books
  • health communication books

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online

Free Play: Improvisation outlet online sale in Life and 2021 Art online