Dept. sale of Speculation (Vintage sale Contemporaries) outlet online sale

Dept. sale of Speculation (Vintage sale Contemporaries) outlet online sale

Dept. sale of Speculation (Vintage sale Contemporaries) outlet online sale
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Description

Product Description

From the acclaimed author of Weather comes a slim, stunning portrait of a marriage--a beguiling rumination on the mysteries of intimacy, trust, faith, knowledge, and the condition of universal shipwreck that unites us all.

ONE OF THE 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR - THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW

A Best Book of the Year: The New Yorker, The Boston Globe, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Vogue.com, Electric Literature, Buzzfeed


In the beginning, it was easy to imagine their future. They were young and giddy, sure of themselves and of their love for each other. “Dept. of Speculation” was their code name for all the thrilling uncertainties that lay ahead. Then they got married, had a child and navigated the familiar calamities of family life—a colicky baby, a faltering relationship, stalled ambitions.

When their marriage reaches a sudden breaking point, the wife tries to retrace the steps that have led them to this place, invoking everything from Kafka to the Stoics to doomed Russian cosmonauts as she analyzes what is lost and what remains. In language that shimmers with rage and longing and wit, Offill has created a brilliantly suspenseful love story—a novel to read in one sitting, even as its piercing meditations linger long after the last page.

Review

“Shimmering. . . . Breathtaking. . . . Joyously demanding.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Slender, quietly smashing. . . . A book so radiant, so sparkling with sunlight and sorrow, that it almost makes a person gasp.” —The Boston Globe

“Powerful. . . . Exquisite. . . . A novel that’s wonderfully hard to encapsulate, because it faces in many directions at the same time, and glitters with different emotional colors.” —The New Yorker
 
“A startling feat of storytelling . . . Each line a dazzling, perfectly chiseled arrowhead aimed at your heart.” —Vanity Fair

Dept. of Speculation resembles no book I’ve read before. If I tell you that it’s funny, and moving, and true; that it’s as compact and mysterious as a neutron; that it tells a profound story of love and parenthood while invoking (among others) Keats, Kafka, Einstein, Russian cosmonauts, and advice for the housewife of 1897, will you please simply believe me, and read it?” —Michael Cunningham

“You can read Jenny Offill’s new novel in about two hours. It’s short and funny and absorbing, an effortless-seeming downhill ride that picks up astonishing narrative speed as it goes.” —The New York Review of Books

 “Gorgeous, funny, a profound and profoundly moving work of art. Jenny Offill is a master of form and feeling, and she gets life on the page in new, startling ways.” —Sam Lipsyte

“Introspective and resonant. . . . Offill uses her novel to explore the question of how to be an artist as well as a wife and mother, when these states can feel impossibly contradictory.” —San Francisco Chronicle

“Absorbing and highly readable. . . . Intriguing, beautifully written, sly, and often profound.” —NPR

“Audacious . . . Hilarious . . . . An account of matrimony and motherhood that breaks free of the all-too-limiting traditional stories of wives and mothers. . . . It may be difficult to truly know what happens between two people, but Offill gets alarmingly close.” —The Atlantic

“Piercingly honest. . . . A series of wry vignettes that deepen movingly.” —Vogue

Dept. of Speculation is a riposte to the notion that domestic fiction is humdrum and unambitious. . . . A shattered novel that stabs and sparkles at the same time. It is the kind of book that you will be quoting over and over to friends who don’t quite understand, until they give in and read it too. . . . A book this sad shouldn''t be so much fun to read. ” —The Guardian (London)

“Whip-smart, defying description, will bring your walls down around you.” —Flavorwire

 “[A] mini marvel of a novel. . . . Unfolds in tart, tiny chapters suffused with pithy philosophical musings, scientific tidbits, and poetic sayings that collectively guide a brainy, beleaguered couple through the tricky emotional terrain of their once wondrous, now wobbly union.” —Elle

About the Author

Jenny Offill is the author of the novel Last Things, which was chosen as a Notable Book of the Year by The New York Times and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times First Book Award. She teaches in the writing programs at Queens University, Brooklyn College, and Columbia University.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

There is a man who travels around the world trying to find places where you can stand still and hear no human sound. It is impossible to feel calm in cities, he believes, because we so rarely hear birdsong there. Our ears evolved to be our warning systems. We are on high alert in places where no birds sing. To live in a city is to be forever flinching.

The Buddhists say there are 121 states of consciousness. Of these, only three involve misery or suffering. Most of us spend our time moving back and forth between these three.

Blue jays spend every Friday with the devil, the old lady at the park told me.

“You need to get out of that stupid city,” my sister said. “Get some fresh air.” Four years ago, she and her husband left. They moved to Pennsylvania to an old ramshackle house on the Delaware River. Last spring, she came to visit me with her kids. We went to the park; we went to the zoo; we went to the planetarium. But still they hated it.  Why is everyone yelling here?

*     *     *

He is famously kind, my husband. Always sending money to those afflicted with obscure diseases or shoveling the walk of the crazy neighbor or helloing the fat girl at Rite Aid. He’s from Ohio. This means he never forgets to thank the bus driver or pushes in front at the baggage claim. Nor does he keep a list of those who infuriate him on a given day. People mean well. That is what he believes. How then is he married to me? I hate often and easily. I hate, for example, people who sit with their legs splayed. People who claim to give 110 percent. People who call themselves “comfortable” when what they mean is decadently rich. You’re so judgmental, my shrink tells me, and I cry all the way home, thinking of it.

Later, I am talking on the phone to my sister. I walk outside with the baby on my shoulders. She reaches out, puts something in her mouth, and chokes on it. “Hold her upside down!” my sister yells. “Whack her hard on the back!” And I do until the leaf, green, still beautiful, comes out in my hand.

I develop an abiding interest in emergency precautions. I try to enlist my husband’s help in this. I ask him to carry a pocketknife and a small flashlight in his backpack. Ideally, I’d like him to have one of those smoke hoods that doubles as a parachute. (If you are rich and scared enough you can buy one of these, I have read.) He thinks I have a morbid imagination. Nothing’s going to happen, he says. But I want him to make promises. I want him to promise that if something happens he won’t try to save people, that he’ll just get home as fast as he can. He looks shaken by this request, but still I monster on about it.  Leave behind the office girl and the old lady and the fat man wheezing on the stairs. Come home, I tell him. Save her.

A few days later the baby sees the garden hose come on and we hear her laughing.

All my life now appears to be one happy moment
. This is what the first man in space said.

Later, when it’s time to go to bed, she puts both legs in one side of her footy pajamas and slyly waits for us to notice.

There is a picture of my mother holding me as a baby, a look of naked love on her face. For years, it embarrassed me. Now there is a picture of me with my daughter looking exactly the same way.

We dance with the baby every night now, spinning her round and round the kitchen. Dizzying, this happiness.

She becomes obsessed with balls. She can spot a ball-shaped object at one hundred paces. Ball, she calls the moon.  BallBall. On nights when it is obscured by clouds, she points angrily at the darkness.

My husband gets a new job, scoring sound tracks for commercials. The pay is better. It has benefits. How is it, people ask. “Not bad,” he says with a shrug. “Only vaguely soul-crushing.”

She learns to walk. We decide to have a party to show off how persony she has become. For days beforehand, she asks me over and over, “Party now? Party now?” On the night of the festivities, I pull her wispy hair up into a ponytail. “She looks like a girl,” my husband says. He seems amazed. An hour later, the guests stream in. She weaves her way in and out of them for five minutes, then tugs on my sleeve. “No more party!” she says. “Party done! Party done!”

Her favorite book is about firemen. When she sees the picture, she will mime ringing the bell and sliding down the pole.  Clang, clang, clang goes the fire engine bell. The men are on their way!

My husband reads the book to her every night, including very very slowly the entire copyright page.

Sometimes she plays a game now where she scatters her stuffed animals all over the living room. “Babies, babies,” she mutters darkly as she covers them with white napkins. “Civil War Battlefield,” we call it.

One day she runs down the block by herself. I am terrified she’ll forget to stop at the end. “Stop!” I scream at her. “Stop! Stop!”

“Just keep her alive until she’s eighteen,” my sister says. My sister has two daredevil boys, fraternal twins. She lives in the country but is always threatening to move to England. Her husband is British. He would like to solve all their problems with boarding school and compulsory backgammon. He has never liked it here. Weak-minded, he calls Americans. To make him happy, my sister serves boiled meat for dinner and makes the peas mushy.

*     *     *

People keep flirting with the wife. Has this been happening all along and she never noticed? Or is it new? She’s like a taxi whose light just went on. All these men standing in the street, waving her over.

She falls in love with a friend. She falls in love with a student. She falls in love with the bodega man. He hands her back her change so gently.

Floating, yes, floating away. How can he sleep? Doesn’t he feel her levitating?

I will leave you, my love. Already I am going. Already I watch you speaking as if from a great height. Already the feel of your hand on my hand, of your lips on my lips, is only curious. It is decided then. The stars are accelerating. I half remember a sky could look like this. I saw it once when she was born. I saw it once when I got sick. I thought you’d have to die before I saw it again. I thought one of us would have to die. But look, here it is! Who will help me? Who can help me? Rilke? Rilke! If you’re listening, come quickly. Lash me to this bed! Bind me to this earthly body! If you hear this, come now! I am untethering. Who can hold me?


What John Berryman said:  Goodbye, sir, & fare well. You’re in the clear.

These bits of poetry that stick to her like burrs.

Lately, the wife has been thinking about God, in whom the husband no longer believes. The wife has an idea to meet her ex-boyfriend at the park. Maybe they could talk about God. Then make out. Then talk about God again.

She tells the yoga teacher that she is trying to be honorable.  Honorable! Such an old-fashioned word, she thinks. Ridiculous, ridiculous.

“Yes, be honorable,” the yoga teacher says.

Whenever the wife wants to do drugs, she thinks about Sartre. One bad trip and then a giant lobster followed him around for the rest of his days.

Also she signed away the right to self-destruct years ago. The fine print on the birth certificate, her friend calls it.

So she invents allergies to explain her red eyes and migraines to explain the blinked-back look of pain. One day, coming out of their building, she staggers a little from the exhaustion of all of it. Her elderly neighbor comes over, touches her sleeve. “Are you okay, dear?” he asks. Carefully, politely, she shakes him off of her.

Sometimes when the wife is trying to do positions, the yoga teacher will single her out for instruction. The wife can’t help but notice that she never has to correct other students in this particular way.

Do not instruct the head! The head is not being instructed!


How has she become one of those people who wears yoga pants all day? She used to make fun of those people. With their happiness maps and their gratitude journals and their bags made out of recycled tire treads. But now it seems possible that the truth about getting older is that there are fewer and fewer things to make fun of until finally there is nothing you are sure you will never be.

*     *     *

The undergrads get the suicide jokes, but the ones about divorce go right over their heads.

You’re a truth bomb, a cute guy said to her once at a party. Before excusing himself to go flirt with someone else.

Q. Why couldn’t the Buddhist vacuum in corners?
A. Because she had no attachments.

The wife is advised to read a horribly titled adultery book. She takes the subway three neighborhoods away to buy it. The whole experience of reading it makes her feel compromised, and she hides it around the house with the fervor another might use to hide a gun or a kilo of heroin. In the book, he is referred to as the participating partner and she as the hurt one. There are many other icky things, but there is one thing in the book that makes her laugh out loud. It is in a footnote about the way different cultures handle repairing a marriage after an affair.

In America, the participating partner is likely to spend an average of 1,000 hours processing the incident with the hurt partner. This cannot be rushed.


When she reads this, the wife feels very very sorry for the husband.

Who is only about 515 hours in.

*     *     *

The weather is theater here. They watch it through the window from their bed.

What Singer said:  I wonder what these people thought thousands of years ago of these sparks they saw when they took off their woolen clothes?

The husband feeds the stove so she can stay in bed. He goes outside to get more wood. The sky looks like snow, he says.
Saint Anthony was said to suffer from a crippling despair. When he prayed to be freed from it, he was told that any physical task done in the proper spirit would bring him deliverance.

At dinner, the wife watches the husband as he peels an apple for the daughter in a perfect spiral. Later, when she is grading papers, she comes across a student’s story with the same image in it. The father and daughter, the apple, the Swiss Army knife. Uncanny really. Beautifully written. She checks for a name, but there is nothing. Lia, she thinks. It must be Lia. She goes outside to read it to the husband. “I wrote that,” he says. “I slipped it into your papers to see if you would notice.”

The Zen master Ikkyu was once asked to write a distillation of the highest wisdom. He wrote only one word:  Attention.
          The visitor was displeased. “Is that all?”
          So Ikkyu obliged him. Two words now.
          Attention. Attention.

Sometimes the wife still watches him sleep. Sometimes she still strokes his hair in the middle of the night and half asleep he turns to her.

Their daughter runs through the woods now, her face painted like an Indian.

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4.1 out of 54.1 out of 5
1,139 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

NSLacy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Unconventional and beautifully written.
Reviewed in the United States on April 27, 2018
I loved this book for its intelligent movement from science to philosophy to imperfect humanity. The voice, structure, and content appealed to my reading tastes. It’s not your typical novel. This is fresh. It’s a book I intend to read more than once. My first read was... See more
I loved this book for its intelligent movement from science to philosophy to imperfect humanity. The voice, structure, and content appealed to my reading tastes. It’s not your typical novel. This is fresh. It’s a book I intend to read more than once. My first read was “wow,” and my second read will be to understand how the hell Offill pulled that off.
35 people found this helpful
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Jeff LeVine
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Kind of a perfect book & often very funny.
Reviewed in the United States on February 7, 2020
The thing that makes this book great is the way it’s written. The plot is extremely conventional (a single woman who dreams of being a great artist, meets “the one,” gets married, has a daughter, loses track of her dreams, then her husband starts to wander), but the way... See more
The thing that makes this book great is the way it’s written. The plot is extremely conventional (a single woman who dreams of being a great artist, meets “the one,” gets married, has a daughter, loses track of her dreams, then her husband starts to wander), but the way it’s told is so unique and often, especially in the first half, hilarious. The whole book is actually built from tiny observations, almost each paragraph is it’s own tiny little perfect thing. Sometimes it almost reads like a dead-pan stand-up comedian just riffing on whatever is going through their head. I really related to the main character’s somewhat troubled take on the modern world, as she tries to hold on, as she hopes to stay somewhat sane, as she tries to find her way back to herself. The book is filled with great observations, even the seemingly random stuff, quotes stumbled across, facts about the Voyager space mission, all help make the book feel perfectly complete in its complicatedly honest portrait of the challenge of keeping going.
16 people found this helpful
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J. Grattan
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Unappealing to say the least
Reviewed in the United States on January 13, 2018
It’s going to take special readers to appreciate this book. If you want short, random, terse, pithy, disconnected statements, several to the page, concerning a marriage and its woes this is your book. However, doubtlessly, many will find the structure and the random... See more
It’s going to take special readers to appreciate this book. If you want short, random, terse, pithy, disconnected statements, several to the page, concerning a marriage and its woes this is your book. However, doubtlessly, many will find the structure and the random thoughts more aggravating than informative. There may be some coherency to all of this but it’s darn hard to discern.
55 people found this helpful
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battachan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Pure poetry
Reviewed in the United States on May 12, 2018
Beautifully written. The wife takes us with her on a fantastic journey through betrayal, fear, freefall, rage, introspection, love, loss and every intense emotion in between. Painting a picture of raw vulnerability at its peak, this book reminded me just why intimacy... See more
Beautifully written. The wife takes us with her on a fantastic journey through betrayal, fear, freefall, rage, introspection, love, loss and every intense emotion in between.
Painting a picture of raw vulnerability at its peak, this book reminded me just why intimacy is so terrifying, yet so necessary for our growth as humans.
This should be required reading for anyone contemplating marriage, going through a divorce, or suffering a major breakup.
The prose is incredible. The insights are sharp. The lessons are arrows aimed at the soul.
20 people found this helpful
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Patricia Ibarra
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What a strange book
Reviewed in the United States on December 26, 2019
A story of love, hope, marriage, child, divorce, but very weird. I read raving reviews of it, one of the best books of the year, but I do not find any appeal in loose statements, jumping back and forth with no order. Maybe I am too square, but it is not the type of reading... See more
A story of love, hope, marriage, child, divorce, but very weird. I read raving reviews of it, one of the best books of the year, but I do not find any appeal in loose statements, jumping back and forth with no order. Maybe I am too square, but it is not the type of reading I like.
12 people found this helpful
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ladysupermarket
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
So beatiful I underlined most of it
Reviewed in the United States on July 30, 2019
I dont quite know how to describe this book. I underlined most of it. Beautiful prose, so easy to read, that leaves the feeling of not knowing the entirety of what you read but yet understanding exactly the emotion that it''s trying to transmit. I am just going to... See more
I dont quite know how to describe this book. I underlined most of it.
Beautiful prose, so easy to read, that leaves the feeling of not knowing the entirety of what you read but yet understanding exactly the emotion that it''s trying to transmit.
I am just going to leave a few beautiful quotes to spark your curiosity:
11 people found this helpful
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Amanda Burrier
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Did not enjoy this book
Reviewed in the United States on September 21, 2019
This book had no depth to the story. It was really hard to get into and feel entertained by this book. I also felt that there was very little character development which also made it hard to enjoy.
9 people found this helpful
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YZPat
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Communication is the answer!
Reviewed in the United States on January 28, 2020
This is a novella meant to be read at one sitting which is easily accomplished. Be aware, the techniques to which you are accustomed in the writing of novels have been thrown out the window. This is a stream of consciousness insight into a marriage of two people who are... See more
This is a novella meant to be read at one sitting which is easily accomplished. Be aware, the techniques to which you are accustomed in the writing of novels have been thrown out the window. This is a stream of consciousness insight into a marriage of two people who are socially aware and kicking against the pricks of societal expectations. They labor at length over minor issues while allowing some pretty important things to go unattended. Always, they come together in forming opinions on what is acceptable and ridiculous. Amazingly, they survive and florish but at what price. The author at once inspires and poinra out some of our foibles. Good read.
5 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Sasha58
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Genuine sweetness and light...but not lightweight
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 26, 2017
I am really puzzled by some of the sneering reviews here, as I found this book to be genuinely moving -- an experimental, which is to say original, approach to what is admittedly an old story, but the reason it''s old is that it does happen in life so often. What impressed...See more
I am really puzzled by some of the sneering reviews here, as I found this book to be genuinely moving -- an experimental, which is to say original, approach to what is admittedly an old story, but the reason it''s old is that it does happen in life so often. What impressed me was that Offill managed to convey it without exactly telling it, to get the facts across obliquely, since we all know the bare outlines already. But what impressed me even more was that, unlike most experimental novels, or novels with lots of intellectual references, it wasn''t some kind of exercise in cerebration; it was suffused with the kind of tenderness you just can''t fake. I agree with a previous reviewer that 10:04 and How Should a Person Be? were merely irritatingly narcissistic, but I truly didn''t feel that way about this book.
10 people found this helpful
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Pamela Scott
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A raw and incredibly sad book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 13, 2019
After reading this book, I don’t think it quite fits into the category, but hey ho, the end of the year is approaching and I’m not going to start changing things now. I found this book incredibly sad. The marriage of the two main characters is disintegrating and the book...See more
After reading this book, I don’t think it quite fits into the category, but hey ho, the end of the year is approaching and I’m not going to start changing things now. I found this book incredibly sad. The marriage of the two main characters is disintegrating and the book consists of extracts from love letters written to each other before they were married and in the early days of marriage before things turned sour. I found it incredibly sad how things gradually started to crumble. The book is funny at times, darkly funny tinged with sadness and regret. I really felt for the characters. I didn’t expect to be some moved by their situation. I’d love to see what else the author has written.
2 people found this helpful
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Jo VanEvery
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fascinating use of form
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 2, 2019
This is a book about a relationship told from the point of view of the woman. Like so much in women''s lives it is fragmented. Parts of it seem like the narrator has dissociated from herself. She starts speaking of herself as "the wife". The form does as much to convey the...See more
This is a book about a relationship told from the point of view of the woman. Like so much in women''s lives it is fragmented. Parts of it seem like the narrator has dissociated from herself. She starts speaking of herself as "the wife". The form does as much to convey the emotional tenor of the relationship as the words do. Both are used masterfully to convey the arc of a relationship. It doesn''t have a neat ending. It does have hope. This book won''t be for everyone. But for those it is for, it is a wonderful book.
One person found this helpful
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Lili
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
and recommend to friends
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 14, 2016
One to read and re-read Of all the books I read last year, and recommend to friends, this is near the top of my list. It''s a tiny novel, but it''s packed like a hand-grenade with the thoughts and ideas of a woman whose marriage is in crisis and whose life - initially happy -...See more
One to read and re-read Of all the books I read last year, and recommend to friends, this is near the top of my list. It''s a tiny novel, but it''s packed like a hand-grenade with the thoughts and ideas of a woman whose marriage is in crisis and whose life - initially happy - seems to be unravelling. All this despite the fact it contains some of the elements I find most off-putting about novels written by creative writing teachers: references to students and writing. Added to this is the fact that it is set in New York, a city already obsessed with itself. And yet I was utterly seduced by Offill''s needle-sharp observations and the wry hilarity of her style. The protagonist skewers her own self-pity, and in doing so, makes you smile. She is a great comic writer.
3 people found this helpful
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E.W
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Don''t expect a "Novel"
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 21, 2020
I know it is not my cup of tea in books. I prefer a story that flows. This one keeps quoting poets and scientists all the time. I know it is what the wife thinks and what is going in her head but the effect of this on my is very off putting. I wish I could get my money...See more
I know it is not my cup of tea in books. I prefer a story that flows. This one keeps quoting poets and scientists all the time. I know it is what the wife thinks and what is going in her head but the effect of this on my is very off putting. I wish I could get my money back. Nevertheless, the seller was prompt and good.
One person found this helpful
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