An Introduction to Modern online outlet online sale Astrophysics outlet sale

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An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics is a comprehensive, well-organized and engaging text covering every major area of modern astrophysics, from the solar system and stellar astronomy to galactic and extragalactic astrophysics, and cosmology. Designed to provide students with a working knowledge of modern astrophysics, this textbook is suitable for astronomy and physics majors who have had a first-year introductory physics course with calculus. Featuring a brief summary of the main scientific discoveries that have led to our current understanding of the universe; worked examples to facilitate the understanding of the concepts presented in the book; end-of-chapter problems to practice the skills acquired; and computational exercises to numerically model astronomical systems, the second edition of An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics is the go-to textbook for learning the core astrophysics curriculum as well as the many advances in the field.

Book Description

A comprehensive and engaging textbook, covering the entire astrophysics curriculum in one volume.

About the Author

Bradley W. Carroll received his B.A. in Mathematics and a Secondary Teaching Credential from the University of California, Irvine, his M.S. in Physics from the University of Colorado, Boulder, and his Ph.D. in Astrophysics from the University of Colorado, Boulder. He then accepted a postdoc with Hugh Van Horn at the University of Rochester and, four years later, accepted a position in the Physics Department at Weber State University, where he served as the Physics Department chair for ten years. He retired in 2015 after thirty years at Weber State University, Utah. During this time, he was awarded the Lowe Innovative Teaching Award and named a WSU Brady Presidential Distinguished Professor. He is an emeritus member of the American Astronomical Society.

Dale A. Ostlie received his B.A. from St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota with degrees in Physics and Mathematics, and his Ph.D. in Astrophysics from Iowa State University. After a two-year teaching position at Bates College in Maine, he moved to Weber State University (WSU), where he worked for thrity years, retiring in 2014. At WSU Dale served as Chair of the Department of Physics for seven years and Dean of the College of Science for eight years. He also served as a collaborator at Los Alamos National Laboratory and worked as an early consultant at the Space Telescope Science Institute. In addition, he has authored or co-authored numerous papers in stellar pulsation theory. While at WSU, Dale was awarded the Lowe Innovative Teaching Award and the Exemplary Collaboration Award. He is a member of the American Astronomical Society.

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Customer reviews

4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
246 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

s. berger
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An excellent intro to Modern Astrophysics
Reviewed in the United States on January 31, 2018
I was especially interested in the latter part about stars and the solar system. The book does require some knowledge of physics and math if you want to explore or understand the equations. I had two years of each including an introduction to quantum mechanics and nuclear... See more
I was especially interested in the latter part about stars and the solar system. The book does require some knowledge of physics and math if you want to explore or understand the equations. I had two years of each including an introduction to quantum mechanics and nuclear physics about forty years ago, so I wasn''t troubled by the equations, but I had no need of really getting into them.
The discussions are worth the money alone and that was what I found most relevant to satisfying my curiosity.
13 people found this helpful
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robert clarke
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Massive -- Everything You Want to Know About Astrophysics
Reviewed in the United States on March 22, 2019
The contents of this massive work cover every aspect of astrophysics, from the origin of the universe to its ultimate fate, and everything in between. The planets and solar system, stellar formation, dark matter, gravitational lensing, galaxy formation and evolution, bound... See more
The contents of this massive work cover every aspect of astrophysics, from the origin of the universe to its ultimate fate, and everything in between. The planets and solar system, stellar formation, dark matter, gravitational lensing, galaxy formation and evolution, bound systems, on and on and on, but you get the point. Truly comprehensive; you wonder how they were able to compile all the material and present it in such a professional fashion. Newly updated, which is important since astronomy changes so rapidly. No wonder the "BOB" (Big Orange Book) is so widely used at the best colleges and universities. However, not for the beginner. Bring all your chem, physics, and math tools -- you''ll need them to enjoy fully this great text.
6 people found this helpful
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Bob M
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent reference and good text book
Reviewed in the United States on July 8, 2020
The authors did an excellent job in providing a well detailed and broad overview of astrophysics. This is a big book, but flows well and will provide the interested reader with a solid understanding of the basic concepts and details of the subject area. As a textbook, it... See more
The authors did an excellent job in providing a well detailed and broad overview of astrophysics. This is a big book, but flows well and will provide the interested reader with a solid understanding of the basic concepts and details of the subject area. As a textbook, it is very good, but not quite excellent. A few more examples in the text would be appropriate. Also, the problem sets need some work. A good problem set should start with simple problems based on chapter topics and build on them slowly. This text tends to jump around and generally begins with fairly in depth problems rather than starting with a simple foundation and building slowly. Hopefully, the authors will work on this in the next edition.

Overall, this is a wonderfully written text on the broad variety of concepts associated with astrophysics and astronomy.
5 people found this helpful
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D. A. Anderson Ph.D
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well worth the cost!
Reviewed in the United States on August 19, 2020
I am very pleased with my copy of BOB. It arrived early and in perfect condition (Thank you "Smart Student"). I have by no means read the book from cover to cover, but intend to use it as a reference. The treatment of some subjects is a little brief, but how much will... See more
I am very pleased with my copy of BOB. It arrived early and in perfect condition (Thank you "Smart Student"). I have by no means read the book from cover to cover, but intend to use it as a reference. The treatment of some subjects is a little brief, but how much will fit into 1278 pages, plus extensive appendices and index? I often use formulas and equations without going back to derive them. This text is excellent when I wish to do so. Some theoretical predictions have been verified observationally since 2007 (e.g. short gamma ray bursts and the utility of multimessenger astronomy), but I keep my smartphone handy for internet updates. I studied steller atmospheres as a grad student back in the "dark ages" and am very pleased with the updated refresher course. I recommend this work without reservation.
2 people found this helpful
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USA Martial Artist
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mediocre Introduction to Astrophysics
Reviewed in the United States on September 2, 2021
This book reminds me of mediocre to poor textbooks assigned for physics courses when I was a graduate student. Though this book was written for an intro level graduate school course it would not be a good supplement for any lecture notes, at best more like a dictionary to... See more
This book reminds me of mediocre to poor textbooks assigned for physics courses when I was a graduate student. Though this book was written for an intro level graduate school course it would not be a good supplement for any lecture notes, at best more like a dictionary to look up a general outline of a topic. Other more advanced graduate school level astrophysics books give far better explanations, motivations, and derivations when appropriate. More effort with them required but they provide a much deeper understanding of the physics. Some chapters are very poor, ex. the brief intro to general relativity. Some chapters could be considered undergraduate level but still presented poorly, more like an intro astronomy text with equations added . Many chapters seem to be more like quotes out of other textbooks than an instructor who thoroughly understands the field. For a graduate level course or even a undergraduate level course this would not be my text of choice or even recommended. I am surprised at the overall good reviews 4 star + which was a motivation for buying this book. There are numerous far better texts. It would be hard for a physics major to use this course as an intro if they are motivated for a career in astrophysics. Some Suggested texts: astrophysics : Weinberg; Bohm Vitense; Duric; ... Cosmology: Weinberg, Dodelson, Ryden; General Relativity: Zee.
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DONALD B. Douglass
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Serious Students of Astrophysics: This Should Be in Your Library
Reviewed in the United States on July 12, 2010
I am a graduate student (2008) with a BA degree in geoscience/astronomy. I have had Carroll and Ostlie''s (C-O) "An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics" or as we students referred to it: "Bob" (for Big Orange Book) both first and second editions, for over 10 years and I... See more
I am a graduate student (2008) with a BA degree in geoscience/astronomy. I have had Carroll and Ostlie''s (C-O) "An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics" or as we students referred to it: "Bob" (for Big Orange Book) both first and second editions, for over 10 years and I find that I consult it often: e.g. when I get stuck on a concept such as spectral line-widths or absorption line wings and depths. The math is there and can be intimidating, but folks, you can''t learn the phenomena behind the things you see in telescopes or hear on the news unless you know a bit of math! A normal introductory astronomy textbook just does not have the depth of explanation that C-O 2ed has.
Great things about this book:
1.) It is pretty complete giving a bit of historical insight into astronomy all the way through Celestial Dynamics, the Solar System, Galaxies and the Universe, Cosmology plus modern Lambda Cold Dark Matter (CDM), the current consensus model of the universe''s structure and possible fate.
2.) The physics are covered in-line in the text meaning, contextually and in an applied manner. An example is the Radiative Processes (bound-bound, bound-free, free-free, and Electron-scattering are covered in Chapter 9 applied to opacity in stellar atmospheres. This is the best way for astronomers to learn the supporting physics as opposed to the author just throwing out the theory with its arcane math as an "exercise for the student" to apply!.
3.) The authors have given consistent ongoing support for the text on a website with errata, supporting diagrams as download-able .jpegs, plus all of the data (constants, planetary info, etc) in download-able datafiles. I just applied over 100 corrections for typos that the authors have collected on the second edition!
This one feature is worth the price of the text and it wasn''t cheap! I have to say that, in my many years as a student of science, that "An Introduction to Astrophysics, 2Ed" is almost unique in its ongoing support of the text with errata corrections.
4.) Be warned: there are no trivial problems at the ends of the chapters in my experience. No "plug and chug" calculations. I have learned there is a solutions manual and I am working on acquiring that. The problems start at a challenging level for first year graduate astrophysics students and go up from there. You might not get an answer after working for some hours on these problems, but you will learn a lot in the process!
In summary, there is no text I have found of comparable scope, written with more effective pedagogical technique, and with more lasting value for the serious astrophysics student than "An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics, 2nd Ed" by Carroll and Ostlie.
58 people found this helpful
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Robert F. Stuart
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A first rate text on Astrophysics. Clearly written from ...
Reviewed in the United States on March 17, 2018
A first rate text on Astrophysics. Clearly written from the basics to complex equations. This text should be in the library of students of physics, at any level.
4 people found this helpful
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John A. Jaksich
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Deeper Understandings
Reviewed in the United States on July 12, 2021
Good introduction to astrophysics— ideal for anyone wishing a deeper understanding than that gained at the Freshman College level. Calculus is a must! If you wish a deeper understanding of the cosmos start with this text. Computer code is provided at a companion web site—,
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Top reviews from other countries

Michael G.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Extremely dry and boring.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 8, 2018
I am a science teacher who also teaches Physics at IB DP level and teaches Astrophysics as the IB option. I bought this book as I thought it would help me to understand the topic better. This book is very frustrating, it has clearly been written by very clever people who...See more
I am a science teacher who also teaches Physics at IB DP level and teaches Astrophysics as the IB option. I bought this book as I thought it would help me to understand the topic better. This book is very frustrating, it has clearly been written by very clever people who understand their area but the moment they step out of their comfort zone they show their ignorance; Example 1. Page 747 Quote: Plants process carbon dioxide into oxygen as a by product of photosynthesis Unquote Plants use the energy of particular photons to split water molecules releasing oxygen. The hydrogen atoms, via a complex process are incorporated into carbohydrates. Example 2. Page 747, discussion of slash and burn and Amazonian rainforests cycling CO2. Recycling and long term storage are different things, if we wanted to reduce CO2 levels we would replace the rainforest with grasslands and store the CO2 as peat deposits. Obviously this would be a terrible idea. Why does he take up half a page about Kyoto when he does not understand anything about the topic? A quick review of each chapter: Chapter 1 The celestial sphere. Good historical summary but all the interesting questions are left as exercises. How do you calculate sidereal periods from synodic data? Chapter 2 Celestial mechanics. Way too much maths, for whom exactly is this for? How are you going to engage students with this level of dryness? Chapter 3 The continuous spectrum of light. All very important but again so dry! No answers provided to the most interesting questions. Chapter 4 Special relativity Not exactly student friendly, as with almost the whole book the author seems to assume a level of previous knowledge, and mathematical ability that is completely unrealistic. Chapter 5 Interaction of light and matter: A very important chapter but more a list of things you should know rather than a gentle explanation of a difficult topic. Chapter 6 Telescopes. Reasonably well done but where is the excitement? Part 2 Stars. Chapters 7-10, all very important but again about as much fun as a bus timetable, no explanation of problems, no working anything through. Chapter 11 The Sun, very detailed Chapter 12 Star formation and Chapter 13 Main sequence again very detailed but so dry. Chapter 14 stellar pulsation, Chapter 15 The fate of massive stars, 16 Degenerate matter. Very detailed Chapter 17 deals with general relativity and black holes, Chapter 18 is close binary star systems including Type1a supernovae. Part 3 is the solar system, this book adds nothing that is not better explained and certainly better illustrated than books dedicated to our solar system. Again so much interesting stuff just left as exercises, I would love the author to explain how Samarium/Neodymium dating works. The Chapter on Pluto and Charon is now obsolete given New Horizons. Part 4 is about Galaxies and cosmology in seven chapters. The impression is that the author wants to get the basics out of the way in a paragraph and then spend the rest of the chapter demonstrating how good he is at math. Big Bang, CMB and WMAP (the three most important things for most High school students) is half of page 1057! Yes this book is essential reading if you are studying astrophysics at university but it completely lacks engagement or explanation. No book should ever say.. “it is left as an exercise for the student to show….” No that’s your job dear Author!
13 people found this helpful
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G. L. Russell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent and Challenging Book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 28, 2021
I bought this in 2018 as a general reference prior to starting an MSc in Astrophysics. It was in regular use as a reference during my course and on completion, I set myself the target of reading it from cover to cover along with other textbooks that I had acquired. I have...See more
I bought this in 2018 as a general reference prior to starting an MSc in Astrophysics. It was in regular use as a reference during my course and on completion, I set myself the target of reading it from cover to cover along with other textbooks that I had acquired. I have to say that I found it mostly very readable. Given its original publication date (2006) there are parts of the book which could have been updated for the 2017 second edition, e.g. New Horizons surveying Pluto and Charon in 2015. It must be acknowledged that a book of this scope will gradually date in parts; unsurprising in this field which is advancing rapidly on many fronts, for example, the detection of gravitational waves. For people with a couple of years undergraduate physics under their belt, it''s straightforward to follow.
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SuperSteff
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book, I would recommend it.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 13, 2018
This is a great book and it has been unbelievably useful for my University degree with clear, concise explanations and examples. When you open the front cover the first couple of pages are of common Physics and Astrophysics constants which is brilliant and easy to refer to...See more
This is a great book and it has been unbelievably useful for my University degree with clear, concise explanations and examples. When you open the front cover the first couple of pages are of common Physics and Astrophysics constants which is brilliant and easy to refer to when there are so many it''s easy to mix them up! At the end of each Chapter there are exercises you can complete to help with continuous learning. These consist of a mix of mathematical, theoretical and computer programming, all which are found in the average Physics Undergraduate course. One star has been knocked off due to the binding of the book. I found that the book I received has been incorrectly assembled, I open the front cover to the back page upside-down. I imagine this is just a one off and other copies are correct but some people may find this annoying and would perhaps appreciate the heads up. It''s not exactly a deal breaker for me so I''m happy =) Overall I would recommend this book.
3 people found this helpful
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Danimal
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Brilliant
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 24, 2018
Got this for stage one physics degree at university. It is a very detailed and very useful book and I would say if you take an Astro module it will be good for later stages as well
9 people found this helpful
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Fernandes92
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Quality of the pages not worth the price
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 12, 2018
Considering the price, I am disappointed in the quality of the pages; waiver thin and fragile, many of mine had crinkles. Only positive thing was same day delivery but that''s because I have amazon prime.
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